Showing posts with label Giant Bamboo Plants UK. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Giant Bamboo Plants UK. Show all posts

10 Awsome Facts About Garden Bamboo Plants

Bamboos have features, structures and properties that are interesting to know, especially if you are a keen gardener. 

Some bamboo can grow to more than 10 metres high in the wild. There are over 10,000 known varieties of bamboo plants in the tropical jungles in Asia and the Pacific. 

The tropical bamboo plants can be found at Kew Garden Palm House in London.

facts about bamboo

Facts About Garden Bamboo Plants

Bamboos are winter-hardy and evergreen all year round. They are great screening plants and many of them thrive in the UK, either as clump-forming (Fargesias) or running (Phyllostachys).

Here are 10 interesting facts about garden bamboo plants for a bamboo grower in the UK. 

  1. Evergreen all year round.
  2. Roots are difficult to remove.
  3. Grow well in pots and containers.
  4. Can withstand cold British winter.
  5. Splinters are sharp. Cuts can be nasty.
  6. Are invasive and need care and attention.
  7. Costs depend on the size and height and cost.
  8. Great sticks for staking plants in the garden or fencing.
  9. Are either running or clump-forming bamboo varieties.
  10. Suitable for garden d├ęcor and centrepiece, borders, fences and privacy screens.

If you want to find out how fast bamboos grow, here is an article that gives Answers to 10 Common Questions about Bamboo.

GIANT TIMBER BAMBOO [Kew Garden Palm House in London]

Bamboo Plants UK - running vs. clump-forming

Running bamboo 

The Phyllostachys bamboo plants have horizontal underground stems called rhizomes. 

These running bamboo plants are great for tall borders and screens and are becoming popular in recent years because of the spectacular colours of the stems.

This variety is invasive and needs close attention to stop it from spreading.

Clump-forming bamboo 

Fagesias are fantastic garden and pot plants. They are non-invasive plants compared to their cousins, the Running bamboo plants. The running bamboo plants have great stem colourations, whereas the clump-forming have dense foliage.

Fargesia robusta and Fargesia nitida are among the best umbrella bamboo for screening because they have dense foliage from top to bottom. 

Awesome Garden Bamboo Plants

The evergreen foliage of the garden bamboo plants is adorable all season. 

Its strong and hardy stems make for a strong fence. The sticks are fantastic for staking beans and sweet peas.

The bamboo plants, whether grown as privacy screens, hedges or used as staking sticks, are growing in popularity among gardeners and homeowners in the UK.

Check out GBP Blog's archive and YouTube Videos for tips and tricks to Grow Bamboo Plants in the UK.  It has an updated collection of articles on ALL-YOU-NEED-TO-GROW-BAMBOO plants.

Bamboo Plants for Sale UK

Garden bamboo plants are popular in the United Kingdom (UK) and are the main features of many gardens. 

They have attractive foliage and bring a tropical effect to the garden, evergreen and dense. 

They are a delight to have in the gardens - here are bamboo plants for sale from top UK suppliers.

Bamboo screen Phyllostachys Vivax UK
Phyllostachys vivax Garden Bamboo Plants

Running vs. clump-forming bamboo

The bamboo plants are native to tropical and sub-tropical areas but come cultivars thrive in temperate in the UK.

Bamboo varieties such as red bamboo, black bamboo and yellow bamboo do exceptionally well in British weather.

 Fargesia robusta and Fargesia nitida are among the best umbrella bamboo for screening because they have dense foliage from top to bottom. 

Although some bamboo varieties are invasive, many UK gardeners are finding simple ways to grow and contain bamboo plants.

Buy Bamboo Plants for Screening

clumping bamboo for sale UK
Clumping Bamboo Plants UK

Small bamboo plants, the clump-forming bamboo plants are great pot and container plants.

The prices are reflective of the various sizes of the plants at the time of the article and a subject to change.

Check with your local garden centre and online stores. Here is a list of top UK bamboo suppliers.

Bamboo plants in pots for sale

The ‘Price range’ in the tables above takes the lower-end price from the major online markets like e-Bay and Amazon at the time of this article.

Costs of Bamboos ranges between £20 and £60 or can be even higher. When buying plants, always choose a reputable garden shop because they sell high-quality plants.

Always check the post and package cost as this may not be included in the final cost of the bamboo plant. This may be dumb, but it is the best way to avoid paying more than you should.

The upper price limits are from the leading Garden Centres in the UK. The upper price limits are indicative of the delivery prices. However, the prices do fluctuate, therefore check the actual door price before making a purchase.

Buy screening bamboo plants

Online bamboo P&P: 

Getting bargain garden bamboo plants from online marketplaces like Amazon and e-Bay can be satisfying.

However, the price of Garden Bamboo Plants from online marketplaces does not include the postage and packing, P&P.

Therefore, it is perhaps important to check out the actual cost price of the plant on sale before buying it.

Home bamboo delivery: 

Many established Garden Centres and online garden shops in the UK factored the cost of delivery into their charges.

Though it may look expensive, the price of bamboo plants on sale is always the home-delivery price.

So whether you are thinking of buying from the major online marketers or at your favourite garden shops, use the Price Range in the tables in this article as a guide. 

Check out GBP Blog's archive and YouTube Videos for tips and tricks to Grow Bamboo Plants in the UK.  It has an updated collection of articles on ALL-YOU-NEED-TO-GROW-BAMBOO plants.

Bamboo plants UK

Online data has shown that in the last 5 years, there is a high demand for bamboo plants. In particular, the clump-forming bamboo plants have been growing in popularity in the UK.

The fast-growing evergreen screen is the ideal option for shielding the unsightly features.

Bamboo Plants UK
Tall Bamboo Plant UK [Phyllostachy vixax areocaulis]

Uses of bamboo plants

Many homeowners and gardeners realised that bamboo plants are best for border fences, henge and privacy screens.

 Additionally, bamboo plants are also popular due to their multiple uses in gardens.

They grow well in the UK climate and thrive throughout the cold winter months.

Check out the list of top UK bamboo suppliers 

Bamboo for borders

Growing bamboo along borders and hedges and as the screen is a delicate undertaking. Here is one of the best border plants.

Sasa nipponica (Fantastic border bamboo]

Best bamboo for screen

Bamboo plants are a great screen because they come in different heights.

Not only that, but the best screens are those that have evergreen foliage that run from the top to the bottom, like this one in the video.

Pleioblastus fortunei Variegata [White-striped Bamboo]


Best Bamboo for shade

Bamboo plants are resilient, they can grow anywhere. Yet, some varieties grow best in shade whereas others prefer sun to part-shade.

So, choose carefully when planting bamboo in shade. Here is a bamboo that does well in shade, VIDEO.

Phyllostachys Bissetii [Green Bamboo]


Get this bamboo from Check the top UK bamboo suppliers 

Hedging bamboo

Bamboos like Sasa Nipponica can be pruned, which makes them the best hedge plant. Grow them along the border, or as hedges to form a formidable screen.

Maintain bamboo plants

Although most borders, hedges and screening bamboo plants need less maintenance, you may have to monitor their growth so that they do not spread.

A regular check all year round is the most effective way to stop the bamboo rhizomes from invading other people’s properties. 

In addition, a regular check is important for pruning the old bamboo and maintaining the hedges so that they stay neat and adorable.

Can You Eat Bamboo Shoots?

Not all bamboo shoots are edible. Of the 1700 different kinds of bamboo plants, less than 200 are considered edible. 

Yet only a handful are delicious, they can be eaten raw or cooked.

Most of the are bitter and require thorough preparations before cooking and eating.

bamboo shoots you can eat
Dendrocalamus giganteus Giant Bamboo Shoot

10 edible bamboo shoots

These 10 edible bamboo plants grow in the UK, either in gardens or in botanical gardens as exotic tropical plants. You can actually grow them.

Most are featured here at Garden Bamboo Plants, follow the links for more details.

Delicious 

  • Phyllostachys flexuosa Sinuate Bamboo [5/5]
  • Phyllostachys vivax Chinese Timber Bamboo [5/5]
  • Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda Walking Stick Bamboo [5/5]
  • Phyllostachys nuda Nude Sheath Bamboo [5/5]
Can you eat bamboo
Phyllostachys vivax Chinese Timber Bamboo Shoot

Good

  • Bamboo Phyllostachys Sulphurea Viridis [4/5]
  • Dendrocalamus giganteus Giant Bamboo [4/5]
  • Phyllostachys edulis Moso Bamboo [4/5]

Edible

  • Phyllostachys atrovaginata Incense Bamboo [3/5]
  • Fargesia robusta Umbrella Bamboo [3/5]
  • Bambusa vulgaris Common Bamboo [3/5]

For more on edible ratings, check out this website https://www.guaduabamboo.com/blog/edible-bamboo-species.

Edible bamboo shoots UK
Bambusa vulgaris Common Bamboo Shoots

Bamboo plants for sale, UK

Here is where to buy the clump-forming bamboo plants online 

We listed some top UK Home and Garden bamboo suppliers like Crocus and YouGarden.

Also, check out Amazon bamboo suppliers.

When to harvest bamboo shoots?

New shoots can be harvested for culinary uses. 

There is approximately a three-year lead time before the edible bamboo plants reach harvestable growths.

Thereafter the plants will continue to produce new shoots every spring and throughout summer.

This will continue for the 60-80 years lifespan of the bamboo plant. 

Bamboo shoot nutrition facts

Bamboo shoots are high in fibres. They also contain calories, carbohydrates and a minute amount of potassium and manganese.

The edible bamboo shoots are great fibre supplements.

are bamboo bamboo shoot edible?
Image credit: @kindabluntish/Twitter

Dried bamboo shoots

Dried bamboo shoots are a traditional ingredient in many Asian cuisines.

They have unique flavours, high in fibre and nutrients. 

Some dishes are cooked with duck, pork and also fish or beef are tasty and delicious.

Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo vs. Yellow Cane Bamboo

Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis) is a spectacular bamboo that closely resembles the Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata). 

The two running bamboo plants have striking yellow stems with green stripes. 

Find out about this outstanding bamboo as compared to its cousin yellow bamboo plants.

Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis
Image credit: Val Bradley @valgardening/Twitter -  (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis)

Garden features

  • Site: Grows well in full sun and partial shade.
  • Soil: Well-drained chalk and loam soil, moist.
  • Uses: Excellent for hedging, screening or large pots and containers. Do not do well in windy sites.
  • Winterhardiness: Hardy to – 15 degrees Celsius.
  • Height: 6 – 8m.
  • Spread: Running bamboo, allow space to spread or contain in large pots.
  • Foliage: Evergreen.
  • Culm colour: Striking Golden yellow, green stripes on rims.

Yellow Cane Bamboo vs. Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo

The key features that set these two Phyllostachys apart are the thickness of the culms and minute colour variations, including the shape, size and height.

Predominantly, the Yellow Cane Bamboo had sturdy, thick and compacted internodes with larger green stripes, whereas the Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo has elongated internodes, slender green stripes and is generally taller.

Read about the Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata)

 

Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata)
STEM of a Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata) - CLOSE UP

Grow Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis)

Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis) is a tall running bamboo that can reach an average of 8 metres in height. 

The lush evergreen leaves contrast beautifully with the golden yellow culms forming an impenetrable hedge.

Invasive, the Yellow Cane Bamboo need space to grow. 

Alternatively surround the roots with the root barrier to restrict the rhizomes from spreading.

Grow Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis) where there is enough space, away from strong wind, or in large pots and containers to contain its spreading.

Mature Yellow Cane Bamboo will thrive in well-drained loamy soil with high moisture and nutrient contents. Like most bamboo plants in the UK, they do not like compacted dry soils.

Although the old bamboo will thrive in most UK conditions, it will occasionally need feed and water. In addition, regular checks are vital to containing the invasive rhizomes from spreading.

Care for new bamboo plants

Although the Golden Grove Bamboos are low-maintenance plants, the new growth will require care and attention.

The slugs adore the tender new growths, they can wipe off the fresh leaves in one visit if left unprotected.

Protect the new growths by adding Slug and Snail Killer, if you are propagating bamboo plants from the rhizome or culm cuttings, or planting a recent purchase.

Maintain Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis)

The Yellow Cane Bamboo Plants are large tall plants

The bamboos' horizontal rhizomes can spread to an average of 4m if left unchecked. It is best to give it space to grow.

Alternatively surround the plants with thick Root Barriers. 

Better to grow them where there is enough space, away from strong wind. Grow in large pots and containers to contain its spreading.

So, now you should have an idea about the stunning Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata) and Yellow cane bamboo (Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. aureocaulis.

Bambusoideae Phyllostachys Bambusoides [Japanese Timber Bamboo]

 Phyllostachys bambusoides is a large, tall bamboo from the sub-family Bambusoideae. 

It grows to over 10m in height, ideal for a walkthrough, large garden, or woodland forest. 

This running bamboo is also called Giant Timber Bamboo (other names include Medake and Japanese Timber Bamboo).

Bambusoideae Timber Bamboo for Sale

The giant timber bamboo plants are hard to find in pots online. Some UK suppliers may sell them on request or source them for you. 

Here is where to buy Giant Timber bamboo plants online. We listed some top UK Home and Garden bamboo suppliers like Crocus and YouGarden.

We list some Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds suppliers on Amazon. 

Bambusoideae Bambusoides Japanese Timber Bamboo

Phyllostachys Bambusoides (Bambusoideae) Features

  • Name: Phyllostachys bambusoides, Madake, Giant Timber bamboo, Japanese Timber Bamboo
  • Site: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers fertile and well-drained, moist soil
  • Uses: Walkthrough, woodland forest, large garden.
  • Winterhardiness: - 10 to – 15 degrees Celsius.
  • Height: 15 - 20m, tall upright bamboo.
  • Spread: 5 – 7m, running bamboo.
  • Foliage: Evergreen Bamboo with spectacular slender long leaves.
  • Culm colour: Thick woody stems, green to golden yellow when matures.

Grow Phyllostachys Bambusoides Japanese Timber Bamboo

The Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo belongs to the bamboo sub-family Bambusoideae, known widely as the Phyllostachys Bambusoides, Japanese Timber Bamboo or Medake.

This impressive bamboo is one of the largest bamboo plants that adapt to the temperate region. 

It thrives in full sun to part shade where the soil is moist but well-drained. Ideal plant for large botanical gardens, walkthroughs and woodland forests.

The Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo loves mild temperatures and high ceilings if grown indoors. 

Alternatively, keep it in pots and containers and place it on the patio or terrace where there is enough sunlight.

The giant timber bamboo plants also thrive in contained spaces and will be reasonably taller than other Phyllostachys varieties. Therefore, take its spread and height into consideration, before choosing a site for planting.

The Giant Timber bamboo and Edulis Moso Bamboo are the two common bamboo plants from the gigantic sub-family Bambusoideae. P. bambusoides can grow in the temperate European climate, including the warmer parts of the UK.

Specimens of these two large bamboo plants can be seen at the beautiful Kew Gardens London or the Trebeh Gardens Cornwall.

Protect tall bamboo plants

The Timber Bamboo is hardy to – 20 degrees Celsius, but unlike its large cousin the Moso Bamboo mentioned earlier here, this bamboo does not like the cold. 

This giant bamboo is susceptible to frost and frozen soil. Prolonged temperatures below 0 degrees Celsius can completely damage this giant.

To save your bamboo from any irreparable damage, add a thick layer of organic mulch or move it to a sheltered site where the cold and frost will not affect it.

Act quickly if you see the browning of leaves or culms. 

If they are growing in pots, cut the long culms and put the plants in a sheltered site. That way, the plant will survive and put out new growth in Spring.

Propagate Giant Timber Bamboo

There are three ways to propagate bamboo plants – from the seeds, by culm and rhizome cuttings, or by separation of the main culm base.

Some people have successfully used conventional ‘Layering’ as the fourth way to propagate large bamboo. 

However, propagating bamboos from the cuttings and by separation is, by far, the two popular ways to get successful plants in the UK.

We list some Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds supplies on Amazon. 

Phyllostachys bambusoides (Japanese Timber Bamboo)

The Phyllostachys bambusoides (Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo) can be hard to find in the UK. 

The best places to see these impressive evergreen bamboo plants are the botanical gardens. Kew Gardens and Trebeh Gardens.

Check at your local Garden Centres or Nursery and ask for the Phyllostachys bambusoides. Or mention the names Medake, Giant Timber Bamboo, and Japanese Timber Bamboo.

3 Best Running and Clump-forming Bamboo Plants to Grow

Do you know they're running and clumping black bamboos that thrive in the UK? These black bamboos, including the Nigra, tend to exhibit dark ebony stem colouration.

The options for choosing running and clumping black bamboos are many, but here are 3 best running and clumping bamboo you can grow in pots or in the garden.

black bamboo plants for sale

Running black bamboo plants

The common black bamboo is the elegant Phyllostachys Nigra

It has distinction black ebony culms (canes/stems) that identify it as the common ‘Black Bamboo’ with running rhizomes and slender green leaves.

This running bamboo is awarded the RHS merit for its unique features. The RHS described it as

one of the most elegant bamboos, with polished, damson-black mature canes and dark green leaves.’

Check out the black bamboo plants for sale at Crocus.co.uk 

Clump-forming black bamboo plants

Another black bamboo is the Black Pearl Fountain Bamboo. Black Pearl is a spectacular fountain bamboo of the Fargesia nitida group with purply black culms and overarching green foliage, non-invasive.

The third black bamboo is Fargesia nitida ‘Volcano’. It is a stunning, non-invasive bamboo, with a reddish-black cane (culm) and brown sheath that forms a beautiful contrast between the dense green leaves.

Check out these UK retailers where you can buy the clumping and running bamboo plants.

Are the black bamboo plants invasive?

The three bamboos are ideal pot and garden plants. These bamboo plants will thrive under the right conditions in the UK.

Black Bamboo Nigra:

The Phyllostachys nigra is an invasive and tall running bamboo. The black bamboo can grow to 6m, and is upright with arching evergreen foliage.

However, in the cooler temperate conditions (and in pots the Black Bamboo Nigra) may not behave like a running bamboo. 

It often shows the features of the clumping bamboo by forming tight clumps.

Black Bamboo nigra Black Bamboo Phyllostachys nigra

More information about here>> Black Bamboo Nigra. You can also check out the names-links for a detailed insight into each type of black bamboo.

Black Pearl: 

Fargasia nitida Murielae ‘Black Pearl’ is an outstanding black bamboo from the clumping variety with an arching cane that can grow to 4m in height. 

It is a non-invasive, medium bamboo.

Black Pearl Bamboo UK Black Pearl (Culms appear ebony black in sun)

Fargesia nitida ‘Volcano’: 

‘Fargesia Volcano’ is also a stunning clumping bamboo that has shades of black on its canes that can grow to 2m in height. 

It is a non-invasive, small bamboo.

Fargesia nitida volcanoe Purply-reddish to dark black culm when matured

What are the common uses of Black Bamboo?

  • Outdoor privacy screen
  • Garden hedging screen
  • Pot and container plants

How to identify clump-forming bamboo plants?

Clumping bamboo and running bamboo are members of the grass family. There are several varieties of bamboo plants. 

Bamboo plants are common in the temperate and tropical zones mainly in Asia, Central and South America and the Pacific region. 

The plants growing in the UK, US and Australia are either clumping bamboo or running bamboo. Sometimes referred to as clumpers or runners, respectively.

5 distinct parts of a clumping bamboo

Identifying the exact bamboo can be difficult unless you have enough time, and botanical knowledge and are curious to find out. 

Also, it can be tricky to identify bamboo by its appearance. 

The 5 distinct parts will help you work out if the bamboo is a clumper or not. 

Use this diagram to help you. 

parts of a clumping bamboo Clumping bamboo parts showing rhizome, shoot, culm base, Base buds, nodes etc.
  1. Rhizome: The rhizome is short, stout and thick forming a tight clump around the parent plant.
  2. Shoot and culm: New rhizome grows upright into a new shoot which eventually becomes culm close to the parent bamboo.
  3. Culm base: The culm base, also called the stem base, is much thicker, at the bottom, than the culm.
  4. Base buds: The base buds (the potential new shoots and rhizomes) are found very close together along the parent rhizome.
  5. Rhizome nodes: The node rings (or rhizome nodes) underground are close together.
All in all, the bamboo rhizomes and underground parts are vital for separating bamboo into groups. So, take a closer look at the rhizome of bamboo if you want to work out if it is clumping or running bamboo.

How to identify clumping bamboo?

Comparing clumping and running bamboos can give you a better idea about these two varieties. 
Check out this article for in-depth information on clumping vs running bamboos). 
It is also best to know the standout features. So, what is clumping bamboo and how can bamboo growers identify it? 

Use the 5 distinct parts of the clump-forming bamboo plant to identify it.

clump forming bamboo for sale uk

Where to buy clumping bamboos in the UK?

We work with some big UK home and garden brands. 
Click here to check out the collection of Clumping and Running bamboo plants from the Home & Garden retailers in the UK.
If you want to grow clumping bamboo, but do not know how to pick them, this Complete Guide to Selecting Bamboo will help you. 
garden bamboo plants UK Guided questions for selecting a bamboo.

Clumping bamboo collections

Fargesia group of bamboos are popular clumping bamboo cultivars. They have a spectacular stem and sheath colourations. 

We feature many of these bamboos here at G.B.P. To find out about the 5 clumping bamboo collections listed below, click here.
  • 1. Fargesia nitida
  • 2. Fargesia murielae
  • 3. Fargesia robusta
  • 4. Fargesia umbrella bamboos
  • 5. Award-winning clumping bamboos

Simba Small Umbrella Bamboo Fergasia Murielae Simba is a popular clumping bamboo

What to do when buying bamboo?

Bamboo plants from garden shops and online marketplaces like eBay and Amazon have clear labels. 

This makes it easy to identify the bamboo. However, mix-ups are likely when buying bamboo plants online and also in stores. 

Whether you are buying bamboo seeds or bamboo in pots, it is always the right thing to read the labels properly. 

Also, read the reviews and plant descriptions before making a purchase. 

What if you cannot find the bamboo you want? 

We suggest checking these renowned UK garden shops

If they still do not have the clumping bamboo that you want, contact them directly. In most cases, they will find what you are looking for.

Grow clump-forming bamboo plants

The 5 parts will help you to identify these bamboos successfully. 

The parts are based around the rhizomes and govern the way these bamboos behave. 

Knowing the parts and their general behaviours can help you work out if your bamboo is clump-forming or not. 

If you have any questions or cannot find what you are looking for, leave a comment and we will get back to you. You can also follow us on Twitter and YouTube.

How fast do the giant bamboos grow in the UK?

 The giant bamboo Gigantochloa verticillate at Kew Garden grows to 2.4 metres in just 16 days.  

In Kew’s Tropical Palm House, the conditions are right for the bamboo plants. The greenhouse imitates tropical conditions, that is why the bamboo grows at this absolutely crazy rate. 

how fast do bamboo plants grow in the UK?

 The giant bamboo Gigantochloa verticillate at Kew Garden grows to 2.4 metres in just 16 days.  


How fast do the giant bamboos grow in the UK? 

To put it in perspective, the giant bamboo grows at a rate of 15 cm per day. Think about a typical classroom ruler is 30 cm, right? 

That would be how tall the bamboo grows in just 2 days. There are several factors that affect the growth of the bamboo plants such as humidity, sunlight, soil and moisture. 

As for UK bamboos, we measure the growth rate of Phyllostachys aureosulcata spectabilis in Summer (one of the common garden bamboos in the UK). 

This running bamboo grows at a rate of 1.43 cm per day. Take a look at how we measured and calculated how fast bamboo grows in a day.

Where to see the giant bamboo in the UK?

The Kew Royal Botanic Gardens is the place to see not only the Giant Timber Bamboos but also garden bamboo plants that grow in the UK.

The Kew’s Tropical Glass House is where you’ll see these three giant bamboos in all their glory. 

So, when you’re in London, visit Kew and see these adorable plants. The Bamboo Garden and Minka Japanese House have over 130 collections of bamboo plants. 

This is by far one of the largest collections of bamboo you will see near London, UK. 

The Bamboo Garden is magnificent, quiet calm and soothing. You can wander through the beautiful walkways and the arching bamboos. Or relax and listen to the rustle of bamboo leaves against the wind. 

Check out our video and image collection of the bamboos at Kew’s Tropical Glass House and Japanese Bamboo Garden.

Uses of Giant Bamboo plants

The giant bamboos are so versatile, they earn the name ‘friends of the people’. 

The bamboo sticks are used in buildings, paper making, utensils and tools, musical instruments and even for food. 

They also protect watershed areas from flooding. In mountainsides, they are important barriers to preventing soil erosion.

However, the giant bamboo natural habitats have now been lost to urbanisation and agricultural land use. 

Yet, it is often planted in stands as a source of building materials.

What Giant Bamboo Plants Grow in the UK?

They are the fastest-growing plants. Kew Royal Botanic Gardens has one of the largest collections of garden bamboos in the UK. 

At Kew’s Tropical Palm House you’ll see the giant bamboos.
  • Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo.
  • Bambusa ventricosa Buddha's Belly Bamboo.
  • Bambusa vulgaris – the Common Bamboo.
The three Giant Bamboos are a must-see. Kew Bamboo Garden also has 130 different bamboos growing naturally.

Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo


Here is what Kew said about the giant bamboo: 

The giant bamboo is the largest of all the bamboos. It grows 25-30 metres in the wild, as tall as a tree. 

This bamboo is native to Southeast Asia and the Pacific, particularly China and Papua New Guinea. In the greenhouse at Kew Gardens, this bamboo reached the top of the ceiling and had to be cut.

Bambusa ventricosa Buddha's Belly Bamboo


Another large bamboo in Kew’s Tropical Glass House is the popular Buddha's Belly Bamboo. 

Its peculiar shiny green culms are a standout – you will hardly miss it. 

The swollen or bulging internodes of its culms resemble Buddha’s fat belly which is why it earns the name Buddha's Belly Bamboo. 

The culms are deep dark green smooth and glossy with multiple branches growing at each node. 

Bambusa ventricosa (Buddha's Belly Bamboo) is probably the most peculiar-shaped bamboo that also grows in the UK. It has a clumping nature, great as a pot plant or garden plant.

Bambusa vulgaris – the Common Bamboo

This giant tropical bamboo also grows in Kew Tropical Glass House, also known as the Common Bamboo. 

An amazing bamboo with glossy green culms, large brown sheaths and hairy rims around the nodes. 

This giant timber bamboo is predominantly used for buildings and constructions and stakes for large garden plants like bananas and sugar canes.

Where to see the giant bamboo in the UK?

The Kew Royal Botanic Gardens is the place to see not only the Giant Timber Bamboos but also garden bamboo plants that grow in the UK.

how fast do bamboo plants grow in the UK?

The Kew’s Tropical Glass House is where you’ll see these three giant bamboos in all their glory. 

So, when you’re in London, visit Kew and see these adorable plants. The Bamboo Garden and Minka Japanese House have over 130 collections of bamboo plants. 

This is by far one of the largest collections of bamboo you will see near London, UK. 

The Bamboo Garden is magnificent, quiet calm and soothing. You can wander through the beautiful walkways and the arching bamboos. Or relax and listen to the rustle of bamboo leaves against the wind. 

Check out our video and image collection of the bamboos at Kew’s Tropical Glass House and Japanese Bamboo Garden.

Uses of Giant Bamboo plants

The giant bamboos are so versatile, they earn the name ‘friends of the people’. 

The bamboo sticks are used in buildings, paper making, utensils and tools, musical instruments and even for food. 

They also protect watershed areas from flooding. In mountainsides, they are important barriers to preventing soil erosion.

However, the giant bamboo natural habitats have now been lost to urbanisation and agricultural land use. Yet, it is often planted in stands as a source of building materials.

Japanese Bamboo Garden in United Kingdom, Kew, London

Bamboos are stunning garden plants, their gentle movements, rustling sounds of the leaves, evergreen foliage and colourful stems are some reasons they are popular. 

One place to see the bamboo in all its beauty is the Japanese Bamboo Garden at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in London. 

The Bamboo Garden has an amazing collection of Chinese and Japanese bamboo. The garden holds over 130 different types of bamboo plants. In addition, the Tropical Glass House has three tropical giants.
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Chinese and Japanese bamboo gardens

Check out the images and videos of the 13 amazing bamboo plants we’ve recorded over the years. 

Let’s begin with the three giant timber bamboos that are currently growing in Kew Tropical Glass House.

Giant Timber Bamboo (Gigantochloa verticillate)

The giant bamboo is one of the largest bamboo plants you can find in the UK. 

It grows 25-30 metres in the wild, as tall as a tree. 

This bamboo is native to Southeast Asia and New Guinea. 

In the UK, this bamboo reaches over 20 metres. Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo - Kew Royal Botanic Garden (Photo: GBP - Inside Glass House)

Buddah’s Belly Bamboo (Bambusa ventricosa)

Buddha’s Belly Bamboo is probably the most peculiar-shaped bamboo. 

An amazing bamboo is a must-see when in Kew Garden Tropical Glass House, London. 

It has a clumping nature, great as a pot plant or garden plant. 

The swollen or bulging internodes of its culms resemble Buddha’s fat belly which is why it earns the name Buddha’s Belly Bamboo. 

The culms are deep dark green smooth and glossy with multiple branches growing at each node.
buddha belly bamboo

Buddah’s Belly Bamboo (Bambusa ventricosa)


Bambusa vulgaris

The giant tropical bamboo, Bambusa vulgaris or Common Bamboo, grows in Kew Tropical Glass House. 

It’s an amazing bamboo with glossy green culms, large brown sheaths and hairy rims around the nodes. 

This giant timber bamboo is predominantly used in building and construction or as stakes for large garden plants in rural China.
Bambusa vulgaris

Bambusa vulgaris

Phyllostachys nigra ‘Henonis’ Black bamboo

This is a tall running bamboo with bright green stems that turn olive green. 

It is one of the Black Bamboo cultivars. 

Be careful not to confuse them with Phyllostachys bissettii. 

They both have glossy green leaves, bright green stems and evergreen arching foliage. 

However, looking closely at the matured stems, the Phyllostachys nigra f. henonis will show signs of olive-yellow canes whereas the Green Bamboo Phyllostachys bissettii canes are obviously dark green, with yellow indentations or stripes.

Phyllostachys nigra ‘Henonis’ Black bamboo


Phyllostachys bambusoides var. subvariegata

Phyllostachys bambusoides has several cultivars. 

The var. subvariegata cultivar, as seen in this image, has upright and dark glossy green culms and zigzagged internodes at the base. 

Phyllostachys bambusoides are commonly called the Japanese Timber Bamboo.

Phyllostachys bambusoides var. subvariegata Phyllostachys bambusoides has several cultivars. The var. subvariegata cultiva

Phyllostachys bambusoides var. subvariegata


Phyllostachys nidularia

Phyllostachys nidularia or Broom Bamboo is a stunning bamboo with erect canes. 

It is known as Broom Bamboo because branches and culms are great bamboo brooms. This running bamboo can grow to 4 metres. 

As a precaution, use the root barrier when growing this bamboo, it is one of the invasive species.

Phyllostachys nidularia or Broom Bamboo

Phyllostachys nidularia


Phyllostachys sulphuria var. viridis

Bamboo Phyllostachys sulphurea viridis is a running bamboo also known as the Ougon-kou Chiku or Kou-Chiku bamboo. 

It’s a stunning ornamental plant due to its appearance. 

At 4m average height, this bamboo is a great addition to woodland forests, large gardens and dense garden hedges. It is edible bamboo.
Bamboo Phyllostachys sulphurea viridis

Phyllostachys sulphuria var. viridis


Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata

Golden Yellow Chinese Timber Bamboo Vivax Golden or Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo is a Tall and thick running bamboo, best for tall hedges and screens. 

The golden stems have spectacular bright green stripes running vertically along the internode. 

Bamboo vivax is an RHS Merit Award-winning bamboo, that grows well in a mild temperate climate.
Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo vivax phyllostachys vivax

Phyllostachys vivax aureosulcata Golden Yellow Chinese Timber Bamboo

Kew's Japanese Bamboo Garden London

Kew’s Bamboo Garden is the best place to see magnificent bamboo plants. 

As mentioned, there are over 130 running and clumping bamboo plants. The giant timber bamboo is about 20 metres tall, reaching the top ceiling of the glasshouse. 

When you’re in Kew Gardens, this is definitely a must-see. These 13 bamboos are our top picks. We hope you like the images and videos. 

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How to Propagate Running Bamboo [Stem and Rhizome Cuttings ]

The plants are of two different types of bamboo plants,  Running and clump-forming bamboo plants. 

Not all methods of propagating bamboo are the same, yet one method may suit the running bamboo whereas the other may suit the clump-forming bamboo. 

The tips below will help you to propagate healthy running bamboo plants. 

Check out the tips for propagating clump-forming bamboo plants here.

How to Grow Bamboo Plants UK

Propagate bamboo from stem and rhizome cuttings

If you already have matured bamboo plants, then you can use the cutting from the branches, culms (stems) or rhizomes (roots) to propagate a new plant.

Take care when separating bamboo rhizomes. 

Use a hacksaw (or a pair of garden loopers) and cut at 45 degrees angle, 5 – 10 cm away from the node.  Avoid splitting them.

  • The best time for propagating new bamboo cuttings is in late summer or early Spring when they reach their full growth and the new shoots are starting to grow, respectively.
  • Take extra care when taking the new cuttings off an old bamboo plant to preserve the parent plant.
  • Treat the new cuttings delicately for them to grow. 

best soil for growing bamboo in pots and garden

Read about the bamboo best plants to grow in pots

Q. When is the best time to propagate new bamboo plants? Late summer is the best time because the cuttings will go to sleep and germinate in spring.

Bamboo propagation tools and preparation

The new cuttings will die if you do not put them immediately into water, or plant them in pots and containers.

It is perhaps important to have the following tools and materials available before taking the bamboo cuttings of bamboo plants.

Preparation: Tools you need to prepare bamboo cuttings

  • Watering can
  • Spade for shifting the soil.
  • Pickaxe or garden fork for digging the rhizomes.
  • Hacksaw or a pair of secateurs for cutting the culms and rhizomes.

Planting: Materials you will need to plant bamboo cuttings

  • Soil
  • Bark or organic materials for mulch
  • Pots and containers for planting the bamboo cuttings.
  • Rainwater or tapwater (avoid using chlorinated water)

Essentials for propagating running bamboo cuttings

Separate the cuttings from the parent plant early in spring or late in summer. Take the bamboo cuttings from the rhizomes, culms or even the base of the parent plant.

  • Rhizomes cuttings: Cut the rhizomes with 4 - 6 buds long, use a pair of secateurs or garden loopers. The best tip is to look for new shoots at the buds. The shots have a high chance of germinating.
  • Stem cuttings: Cut the culms 5 – 10 cm away from the node. Plant them deep in rich soil, either in a container or directly in the ground.
  • New culms: This is my favourite because they grow every time. Check for new culms that have a couple of branches. Carefully, dig them up and prepare them for propagation in pots.
  • Water the new cuttings/plants thoroughly.
  • Mulch the new bamboo plant using bark or other organic materials.

5 factors affect the growth of bamboo new cuttings

Propagating bamboo plants is a long-term affair. Take these 5 factors into consideration when growing new bamboo plants.

1. Choose the site carefully

The two bamboo plant varieties in UK gardens are tough plants. But the new plants are susceptible to the weather. 

New bamboo plants grown from cuttings should be propagated in locations where there is a good amount of sunlight and away from direct wind.

2. Identify the garden feature you want

Running Bamboo plants are ideal for growing in the garden. 

They have tall colourful stems, unmistakably evergreen. Winterhardy, are permanent screen all year round.

Read about the features and cost of the two bamboo varieties and 13 types of bamboo grown in the UK.

3. Prepare the soil

Bamboos are tough plants. They can endure poor soils, but it is better to propagate the new cuttings in nutrient-rich soil topped with mulch.

If you’re propagating new bamboo in a container, use potting mix or well-sieved soils and fine sand.

4. Maintain early-stage care

The new bamboo cuttings will need the right amount of water and attention in Spring as the roots start to develop and the leaves come out. 

Pay extra attention when planting the bamboo cuttings in late Spring or early Summer.

Mulching is highly recommended as it will help to retain water in soil or pots and containers ( where the cuttings are planted).

5. Monitor new bamboo growth

While the bamboo cuttings are growing, you should regularly check them for any signs of wilting, bug infestation, weeds, and lack of sunlight.

Taking good care of the new bamboo cuttings/plants will give you a 100% success rate.

Key points for growing bamboo cuttings

Here are the key points for growing running bamboo plants

  • New plants need some attention.
  • Water generously to keep the soil moist.
  • Running bamboo plants are ideal for outdoor gardens and tall screens.
  • Grow cuttings in spring, use nutrient-rich soil and mulch to grow cuttings.
  • New plants need constant attention. Water generously, keep the soil moist.

Important checks

The new cuttings will require care and attention when you see the signs of new leaves. So, check for the following.

  • The soil remains moist, but not waterlogged. (Read about the best soil for growing bamboo)
  • Check for unusual paleness on the culm and leaves, as any change in colour will reveal the condition of the cuttings.
  • Move the new plants to a safer location IF the temperature drops or rises dramatically.
  • Do not place them under big trees, when placing the cuttings in shades, as the falling branches will ruin your hard work.

Enjoy the growth and development of your new bamboo plants because they are amazing plants. 

Check out this article on Bamboo Plants that Thrive in UK Gardens, it is an insightful take on how to identify and grow new bamboo plants.

We hope this article inspires you to grow your own Bamboo plant in the garden and enjoy the beauty of this amazing plant.

This page contains articles on how to propagate healthy bamboo plants - check out the archive for more info.