Showing posts with label How Fast Bamboo Grow. Show all posts
Showing posts with label How Fast Bamboo Grow. Show all posts

How to Grow Bamboo from Cuttings [12 MONTHS 6 VIDEO UPDATES]

I grow the Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo, Phyllostachys vivax f. areosulcata from Rhizome cuttings in August last year.  The bamboo plants are a year old and are looking great.
It has been a year of learning to grow bamboo from cuttings. It requires care for the delicate new shoots where I kept the snails away, staked the new bamboo shoots and watered them during the warm summer months.

how to propagate bamboo UK
 

Height of the bamboo plants - measured

I measure the height of the bamboo plants at 2 weeks (August), 4 & 6 weeks (September) and 8 weeks (October). The growth pattern I observed was interesting

The fast-growing bamboo shoots reached over 60cm in 8 weeks (2 months).

By the end of the 12th month, the height of the longest bamboo was 106cm which means that the bamboo shoot grew only 40cm in 10 months.
But, something interesting happened during that time. [Watch the 1 Year Video Update to find out what happened]

VIDEOS UPDATES: How to Grow Bamboo from Rhizome Cuttings

This raw video list shows the work that I did over the period of 12 months, from the summer of 2021 to 2022.

Video 1: Grow Bamboo in the Propagating medium (2 weeks growth)

I used a bucket as a bamboo propagator. Planted the rhizomes in the bucket for 2 weeks until the roots and shoots germinated before transplanting them into Holding Pots.


Video 2: Bamboo Growing in the Propagating medium (4 weeks growth) New Growth Eaten by Slugs

I had to stop the slugs from eating the new shoots by applying slug & snail pellets.  It worked.


Video 3: Transplanting new bamboo from Propagator to Holding Pot (4 weeks growth)


Video 4: Calculating the Growth Rate of Bamboo in the Pots (8 weeks growth) - how fast does bamboo grow in a day?


In this video, I measured the height of the new bamboo shoots for 8 weeks and found the growth rate of this bamboo.

Video 5: How tall a bamboo grows in one year


From my observations, a new shoot will grow super fast in the first two months.

Then, put out branches and leaves and establish the rooting underground.

The first shoot can reach a metre to two metres, eventually doubling the height as it grows.

Video 6: What happens as a new bamboo plant grows? [Expected Height by Year]



Like most plants, a newly planted bamboo will not reach its full height in the first year.

Each year the bamboo will grow taller, in some cases twice as tall as the previous plant.

It will reach its matured height in 4-5 years and last for as long as 20-30 years.

Notably, a bamboo grove can last even longer due to the bamboo plant's re-generative growth behaviour, unlike the trees.

Important note about bamboo propagation

Different bamboo plants have different growth rates and patterns, features, soil, light & shade preferences.

Also, the propagation technique (seedlings, rhizome cutting, stem cuttings, etc) used will affect the growth of new bamboo plants. 

In this particular work, I am propagating the Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo, Phyllostachys vivax f. areosulcata from Rhizome cuttings.

Use it as an informational guide to growing the tall Phyllostachys from the rhizome cuttings. 

World Bamboo Day 2022 - It is Time to Grow Bamboo

World Bamboo Day is celebrated annually on the 18th of September. The theme for this year is 'It is Time to Grow Bamboo'. Use the hashtag #GrowBamboo when celebrating the 2022WBD.

It aims to raise awareness about the importance of conserving bamboo plants and promote the bamboo industry. 

World Bamboo Day 2022

Importance of bamboo plants

Bamboo plants have been used by many indigenous communities for sustainable living. They are used in arts and crafts, as building and construction materials, as food etc. The uses are limitless.

Today, bamboo plants are used as raw materials for producing products like paper and furniture. 

The numerous bamboo plants with their evergreen lush foliage have made them useful outdoors garden plants.

Bamboo plants have a peculiar growth pattern. The regenerative behaviour puts them among the top oxygen-producing plants and air purifiers.

Rapid growth in the demand for bamboo products, urbanisation and deforestation has seen a decline in bamboo plants in Asia, Africa and Oceania where they are endemic.

There is a need to conserve bamboo plants and promote their sustainability in the bamboo industry. 

Aims of World Bamboo Day

World Bamboo Day (WBD) aims to 

  • raise awareness about the potential of bamboo plants, 
  • protect their environments and 
  • ensure sustainable use of bamboo. 

World Bamboo Day 2022

  • Event: World Bamboo Day
  • Date: Sunday, 18th of September, 2022
  • 2022 Theme: It is time to plant bamboo
  • Social Sharing Hashtag: #PlantBamboo
  • Observed: Worldwide
World Bamboo day 2022

We are featuring a new collection of bamboo hashtag #KnowThisBamboo to celebrate #WorldBambooDay.

Short videos of #bamboo to help you ID them are coming out everyday, this month and next.

Subscribe to GBP YouTube channel 

World Bamboo Day Initiative

World Bamboo Day was an initiative of the World Bamboo Organisation, in 2009 at the 8th World Bamboo Congress held in Bangkok. 

Delegates from almost 100 countries attended the event and agreed to mark the 18th of September every year as World Bamboo Day.

Here is what the WBO said about this special day

''World Bamboo Day is a day of celebration to increase the awareness of bamboo globally. Where bamboo grows naturally, bamboo has been a daily element, but its utilization has not always been sustainable due to exploitation. The World Bamboo Organization aims to bring the potential of bamboo to a more elevated exposure – to protect natural resources and the environment, to ensure sustainable utilization, to promote new cultivation of bamboo for new industries in regions around the world, as well as promote traditional uses locally for community economic development.'' [WBO website accessed 01/09/2022]

World Bamboo Day FAQs

When is World Bamboo Day observed?

World Bamboo Day is observed annually on the 18th of September. 

What is the aim of World Bamboo Day?

It aims to raise awareness about the importance of conserving bamboo plants and promote the bamboo industry.

When was World Bamboo Day initiated? 

It was initiated in 2009. 

Which organisation started World Bamboo Day?

It was an initiative of the World Bamboo Organization.

Is bamboo as strong as steel and concrete?

As a construction material, the tensile strength of bamboo is as strong as steel and sturdier than concrete.

MORE BAMBOO FAQs at GardenBambooPlants.com

How quickly does bamboo grow? 

At Kew Indoor Palm House, the giant bamboos grow grows to 2.4 metres in just 16 days, that's 15 cm per day.

How fast does bamboo shoots grow in a day in the UK? [VIDEOS]

Over the last 8 weeks, we attempted to answer the question 'How fast does bamboo grow in a day?' We identified the growth rate of the running bamboo that we propagated from the rhizome cuttings. 

Though this work is ongoing, we are excited to reveal the rate at which the bamboo is growing.

Bamboo Phyllostachys aureosulcata spectabilis grow at a rate of 1.43cm per day.

Find out about our latest work on bamboo plants

 

Growing and Caring for Bamboo Plants

We are monitoring the growth rate of the bamboo Phyllostachys vivax aureacaulis and Phyllostachys aureosulcata spectabilis to show how fast bamboo grows in the UK.

These two running bamboo plants are common and we hope that their growths will give some answers to the question.

See the GBP video on our YouTube channel, Amazing Bamboo Plants, here. This video is the 4th of a series about Growing and Caring for Bamboo Plants.

Propagate bamboo rhizome cuttings

We propagated the rhizome cuttings from a recent pruning, see the work we wrote about earlier. We also noted that there are several factors that can affect the growth rate. 

The obvious factors are the changes in seasons. We propagated the bamboo at the end of Summer. The Autumn to Winter conditions can affect the rate of growth.

Slug eating the leaves of the bamboo is another factor that we mitigated successfully by applying Slug and Snail Killer around the new bamboo. 

In our experience, slugs disturbed the bamboo shoots and leaves from growing. As we added the protection, the bamboo shoots and leaves we left undisturbed.

How to propagate rhizome cutting in two steps

We propagated the bamboos in a 'growing medium' (a bucket with nutrient-rich soil) for 4 weeks, then transplanted the rhizomes cuttings into 'holding pots'. 

A two steps propagating technique that gives the cutting a 100 percent chance of growing.

The result, as indicated in the 4th video, was astounding!

How to calculate the growth of bamboo shoots in a day

We calculated how fast bamboo grows in a day by taking the measurements at two weeks intervals. Then, we divided the length by the number of days it took for the new plant to grow.

Bamboo growth rate = length/number of days

The measurements from the 4th and 8th weeks indicated that the new bamboo shoot grows at a rate of 1.43 cm per day.

As mentioned earlier, we propagated the bamboo in two steps, from the 'growing medium' to the 'holding pot'. So, we used the measurements from the 'holding pots' to minimise the margin of error.

If you do not have bamboo plants and want to buy potted bamboo plants, check out the UK retailers here.

Find out how fast bamboo shoot grows in a day

Follow GBP's YouTube channel as we track the progress of the Phyllostachys aureosulcata vivax and other bamboo plants we grow.

So far, we have 4 videos, each showing the different stages of propagating bamboo from rhizome cuttings.

  1. Propagating medium (Video 1 shows 2 weeks growth)
  2. Propagating medium (Video 2 shows 4 weeks of growth) New Growth Eaten by Slugs
  3. Transplanting from Propagating medium to Holding Pot (Video 3 shows 4 weeks growth)
  4. Calculating the Growth Rate (Video 4 shows 8 weeks of growth) - how fast does bamboo grow in a day

From our experience, we can confirm that bamboos are, indeed, fast-growing plants.

How does a bamboo plant grow? [VIDEO]

This is an important question because after growing a bamboo plant, you’d be anticipating that lush evergreen screen. Right?

The video info gives clarity on how a bamboo plant grows from year to year. If you want to know how fast bamboo grows, check out this article.

But, bamboo plants like other plants will take time to grow to reach full height and maturity. This video shows first-year growth. 

Under the right conditions, bamboo plants will provide that beautiful greenery within 3 years. The first growth will continue to mature for up to 5 years and, interestingly, remain evergreen for up to 20 years.

The new shoots will be taller than the previous growth until the bamboo grove reaches its maximum height. 

Thereafter, the bamboo grove will remain evergreen for as long as it can.

As the bamboo matures, you will need to prune the old bamboo culms and rhizomes to promote new growth. Or transplant the ones that outgrow the pots. 

Here are some guides to bamboo Care and Maintenance Tools that you will find useful if you have older bamboo plants in your garden.

Watch videos and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

 

Related articles on Evergreen Outdoor Privacy Screen

Readers' note: This article is so long that we split it into several parts. Here are the related parts that you may also like to read:

Fast-growing Plants for Shade Year Round

Bamboo screening is a great option for creating a cool and calm area in the garden.

Most bamboo plants are winterhardy and can also tolerate high temperatures and humidity.

The main concern for growing bamboo is the invasiveness of some species. But not all bamboo plants are invasive.

Use the non-invasive bamboo plants to create an ideal shaded area in the garden 

fast growing plants for shade

Non-invasive fast-growing bamboo

Fargesia, a modestly sized, 3-4 metre bamboo that is clump-forming, is an effective way of creating an instant cool corner.

Fargesia murielae and Fargesia robusta bamboo plants come in different sizes, shapes and colours. 

The common Fargesia bamboo plants are Fargesia nuda and Fargesia papyrifera. 

There are, in fact, hundreds of clump-forming bamboo cultivars that you can grow in the garden for shade and not have to worry about spreading. 

We documented over 50 of them here.

Common fast-growing climbing plants

Other shade-giving plants and vines are fast-growing, though most of them are deciduous. They lose their leave in spring.

Create pockets of shade with a trellis and a fast-growing climber like Jasmine Officinale, which also produces the most wonderful scent. 

Other fast growers are passion flowers or evergreen honeysuckle like Copper Beauty.

Grape vines, kiwis, and wisteria are fast growers, too, and look amazing grown up in a pergola.

List of fast-growing shade plants

Grow evergreen Fargesia bamboo for shade all year round or climbers and creepers for shade in summer.

Here is the list of the best fast-growing plants for creating shade.

  • Bamboo plants (evergreen)
  • Jasmine Officinale
  • Passion flowers
  • Copper Beauty (evergreen)
  • Grape vines
  • Kiwis
  • Wisteria
For year-round plants for shade that are fast-growing, choose Fargesia bamboo and Copper Beauty.

The beautiful Secret Garden at Bleinheim Palace, Oxford, UK. Fargesia bamboo plants are featured in this garden for shade.

How to split bamboo plants?

Can you split bamboo plants for planting? The answer is yes, of course, you can divide bamboo into many parts before planting it in the ground. 

But importantly, will the segmented plants do as well as the parent plant? Let’s have a look at how you can divide a bamboo plant and yet get the best result.

How to split bamboo plants?

Split running bamboo and clumping bamboo

The bamboo plants from the nurseries come in pots ready for planting.

Many gardeners and homeowners prefer to plant the potted bamboo straight into larger pots or in the garden. 

It is perfectly fine if you are growing bamboo for decorative purposes or as ornamental pot plants. 

However, if you plan to use bamboo as a natural screen for a small outdoor space or for garden hedging, it would be ideal to separate the bamboo into smaller segments so that you can get several plants growing at once. 

In fact, you can split both the running and clumping bamboos into small divisions and plant them out. They are vigorous plants and will do well under the right growing conditions. 
If you need more details, here is how to provide the right conditions for new bamboo plants to grow.

How to split bamboo plants?

So, how do you split bamboo plants? 

The best way to split bamboo is to divide them into equal parts while keeping the roots hairs and rhizomes intact. 

These 10-pointers will help you to split the bamboo plants and grow them for the best results.
  1. Remove the bamboo from the growing pot. (If the bamboo is too hard to remove, add water – or soak the whole pot in water – before trying again)
  2. Inspect the rhizome nodes, root hairs, and signs of new growth.
  3. Use a hacksaw or handsaw to separate the bamboos. Ideally, you should have 3 – 5 culms on each segmented bamboo.
  4. Remove any dry culms, branches or leaves.
  5. Trim the top of the long culms to redirect nutrients and energy to other parts of the plant where they are needed the most.
  6. Soak the segmented bamboos in water before repotting or planting in the ground. It is a good idea to plant the segmented bamboos into the ground immediately. Always, keep the root moist if you need to take a break before planting.
  7. Compact the soil or compost into the hole or pot.
  8. Support/Stake any long culms.
  9. Add Mulch generously.
  10. Add water.

 

Pros and cons of splitting bamboo plants

Splitting bamboo plants into equal segments is particularly beneficial if you do not want to buy additional plants for privacy screening or garden hedging. 

In hindsight, you save money when dividing a bamboo plant before planting, and will probably get the most out of what you buy. 

Alternatively, grow the bamboo in the garden and separate them as they grow to fill out the gaps in the hedge. 

Note that the bamboo plants are fast-growing, but it can take 3 – 5 years before you can safely take cuttings off them. 

The major factor that you should consider when splitting bamboo is the growth factor – whether the segmented plants will do well or not!

Split potted bamboo plants before-care

Cutting the plants can cause stress which can destroy the whole bamboo. Instead of getting more than one plant, you might end up getting nothing. 

So, here are three things that are important to ensuring the segmented bamboo plants grow: time, site and soil. 

Time: 

The planting season is important. This is also the time when you can separate the potted bamboo plants and re-grow them.

Many experts recommend planting bamboo early in Spring when the plants’ growth is prominent. 

Site: 

Prepare the site properly. 

Bamboos are tolerant plants. They will grow where you plant them. 

However, to create an ideal growing site, dig holes twice as wide as the diameter of the plants, and deeper than the heights of the ‘holding pots’. 

Understandably, the wider and deeper the holes, the easier it will be for the new bamboo plants to establish themselves. 

Soil: 

Use loam soil which is best for growing bamboo plants. Alternatively, use 50/50 compost. 

Add mulch and tend the plant immediately after planting and the following Summer to protect and care for them as they grow. 

Water generously, but not too much that it gets waterlogged.

Split bamboo plants after-care

In the early stage, you need to pay close attention to the bamboo, especially the bamboo plants that you grow from divisions. 

Not only that the plants are under stress, but the new conditions may not be favourable. 

Furthermore, it is going to be fairly warm in Spring and Summer. The new plants will require a generous amount of water. 

Also, the slugs will be out to ‘party’ – add slug pellets to protect the new growth. Other care provisions include the following:
  • staking the new culms so that they do not break,
  • adding mulch to preserve and or retain moisture, and
  • weeding and removing fallen leaves that are covering any new growth.
Keep an eye on the new plants to make sure they do not dry out in the summer. 
In closure, you can split a bamboo plant into segments and grow them. The pros of splitting bamboo plants outweigh the cons. 
Get the time, site and soil right when splitting and planting the bamboo in pots or in the garden.

What to do when your bamboo leaves turn yellow

Newly planted bamboo leaves sometimes turn yellow when you split the potted bamboo and grow them. The main cause of the yellowing of leaves is stress. 

revive bamboo leaves turning yellow or curling 

If you see that the leaves will turn yellow, or nothing happens, in the first 2 weeks, there is a need to worry.

It will take time, at least 4 to 8 weeks, to see signs of growth. 

So, keep watering the plants and check that the soil is not too dry or too wet. (See the video of the bamboo plants we grow from culm cuttings)

 If you see no activity after 8 weeks, try these options:
  1. Leave them for a further 2 weeks (By then, the new bamboo plants will have been in the ground for 10 weeks – Spring to Summer).
  2. Dig the plants out and inspect the whole bamboo. (This is the last thing to do- but do not be surprised to see fresh rhizomes or a new shoot popping its ‘head’ out)
  3. Just leave the bamboo in the soil over Autumn and Winter. (Bamboo plants remain inactive on the top, but there will be a lot of activities underneath the soil. Leave the newly planted bamboo plants to rest and check on them the following year).

Time it takes for bamboo to grow

The video shows the time it takes for a new bamboo plant to grow from culm cutting.

Bamboo fast-growing evergreen hedge plants?

Bamboos are not the only fast-growing hedge plants. The other fast-growing shrubs for hedging and privacy screening. They are great alternatives to traditional hedge plants like the Green Leylandii, Photinia, Red Robin, Western Red Cedar, Portuguese Laurel and Beech.

The hedging shrubs are evergreen and retain their foliage all year round, while the others are deciduous and lose their leaves in Autumn. 

Many of the hedging trees and shrubs require pruning and mulching to provide neat covers or they’ll grow tall uncontrollably. 

Bamboos are fast-growing, if not the fastest, among the hedging and screening plants. 

In addition, the bamboos are a standout because they come in different varieties. 
We will identify what makes bamboos a good option for hedging, but first, you may be interested in this article that let’s compare the growth rate of 6 common hedging shrubs and trees in the UK.

Bamboo plants are great alternatives to traditional hedge plants like  Green Leylandii Photinia Red Robin Western Red Cedar Portuguese Laurel Beech.
 

Why use bamboos as a hedging plant?

The bamboos are a group of special hedging plants. 

They will grow fast, reach a certain height and remain evergreen for many years. They have been used extensively in modern landscaping and garden designs to great effects. 

Growing at 2 – 5 ft or 60 - 150cm per year, bamboo is the option for quick hedging. It is fast-growing, evergreen and stands out as the only grass plant for hedging. 

There are, in fact, many varieties of clumping and running bamboos that are suitable for both home and garden hedging. 

Furthermore, these plants come in various sizes, shapes and colours perfect for tall and short hedges. You can trim some bamboos to give a neat hedge while others may not require any trimming at all.

What are the best bamboo plants for hedging?

Although the running bamboo plants are invasive, growing them in contain structures or pots and containers are ideal containment measures. 

Alternatively, choose the clumping bamboos as they are the better options for dense hedges. 

So, if you are looking for a better alternative to the common trees and shrubs and other hedging plants, bamboo hedges are great options.

All You Need to Know About Selecting Bamboo Plants is a guide that will lead you to the right bamboo depending on your preferences. So, check it out and download the PDF version.


easy guide for selecting bamboo hedging plants UK

Pros and cons of bamboo hedge plants

As a grass variety, bamboos have slim culms, are tall, and slender and tend to grow in masses providing dense evergreen foliage covers all year round. 

But, the running bamboo varieties are invasive and spread very quickly putting out lots of shoots and rhizomes every year. 

This is one of the major reasons why many homeowners and gardeners do not want to grow bamboo hedges. 

Many homeowners who inherited bamboo may find it overwhelming to control the bamboo. These neglected bamboos will require a lot of work to remove

They are like a rowdy toddler if you neglect them. 

However, the pros of growing bamboo far outweigh the cons. 

Bamboo plants are formidable hedges. You have to select them carefully, choose the ideal site and care for them as they grow just like the other hedging plants.

How to grow a bamboo hedge?

Clumping bamboos will need spacing of less than a metre in between them. As the clumpers grow, they’ll cover the spaces and provide a formidable hedge. 

The clumpers are perfect for low hedges. 
You’ll have to buy enough clumping bamboo to give you a good hedge or alternatively split the bamboo potted plants so that you can get the thick hedge. 
The running bamboos will spread and ultimately form a dense hedge within 2 to 3 years and reach matured height in 10 to 20 years. 

So, space them out at least a metre to 1.5 metres apart. 

Reassuringly, you do not have to worry about how far to space them. Once the bamboos grow, you can then move them around to cover the gaps.

Care for bamboo hedges

As mentioned earlier, not all bamboos will require trimming. 

They grow to a certain height (called the matured height) and remain that way for 10 – 20 years. 

Whereas other bamboos can be pruned to give a neat appearance. Either way, it boils down to selecting the right bamboo that suits you. 

 The common bamboo care and maintenance include:
  • thinning,
  • mulching,
  • pruning,
  • fertilising,
  • dig a trench, and
  • build boot barrier.
More details on How to Care for Your Bamboo here.

How to care for bamboo plants Provide the right care for your bamboo hedge

Must-do when growing bamboo plants

Before planting bamboo, whether it’s a runner or clumper, you should build a barrier especially when growing them as hedging plants. 

This is an important measure because as they grow, they’ll either spread (runners spread) or expand (clumpers expand). 

Barriers can be root barriers, trenches, raised beds or contained structures – any that works for you.

6 fast-growing evergreen hedge plants in the UK

In the UK, many hedge trees and shrubs are either evergreen or deciduous. Some lose their leaves in spring whereas others remain evergreen, including the bamboo plants. 
What are the fast-growing evergreen hedge plants in the UK? Here we take a look at 6 evergreen, fastgrowing hedge plants. Bamboo, Green Leylandii, Photinia Red Robin, Western Red Cedar, Portuguese Laurel and Beech. 

evergreen, fastgrowing hedge plants  - Bamboo Green Leylandii Photinia Red Robin Western Red Cedar Portuguese Laurel Beech
 

6 fast-growing evergreen hedge plants

Most hedging plants are evergreen except Beech which loses its leaves in Autumn. 

The beech tree has tightly packed branches that still provide the hedging cover in Autumn and Winter, except for the greenery. 

Of the 6 plants, bamboo is the only grass variety among the fast-growing evergreen hedging plants.

fast-growing hedge plants UK - Bamboo Green Leylandii Photinia Red Robin Western Red Cedar Portuguese Laurel Beech

Check out the YouGarden Collections of hedging plants. (Affiliate link)

Source: RHS, Woodland Trust, et all.

Tips for selecting the right hedging plants

(The article All you need to know about Selecting Bamboos for Hedging and Screening also provides additional information on the different bamboo plants. Check out the article linked)

easy guide for selecting bamboo hedging plants UK

Where to buy hedging?

We work with some big UK home and garden brands. 

Check out the links to go straight to their website where you can find out about the hedging plants we feature in this article.

Fast-growing evergreen hedge plants

We know that bamboos are among the 6 fast-growing hedge plants in the UK. 

They are at the top of the group of evergreen hedging plants and come in various shapes, sizes and colours. 

They will require some care and attention as they grow. 

If you want a quick hedge, bamboos are definitely a better option.

How to Grow Clumping Bamboo Fargesia murielae Red Zebra

 Clumping bamboo plants are low-maintenance plants. They do not spread from the parent plants.  

Here is a quick tip on how to propagate and grow clumping bamboo plants.

Propagate clumping bamboo ‘Red Zebra’

This clumping bamboo grows well by clump-base division. It can take 4 – 5 years before this bamboo requires some sort of clump division. 

The bamboo’s clump base will expand and cover the spaces where you plant them. 

You can also get more plants when they’ve matured. 

To propagate new Red Zebra bamboos, separate the bamboo into several divisions and grow them in propagation pots before planting them into holding pots or straight into the garden. 
This video shows how we propagate propagating using the three different techniques.

Grow clumping bamboo in containers and barriers

Fargesia murielae ‘Red Zebra’ is a tough bamboo, it will thrive in contained spaces where conditions are suitable. 

Its height and spread make it a perfect plant for growing in pots and containers, ideal for making a statement in the front entryway like the driveway, porch or veranda. 

Newly planted Red Zebra bamboo will require a good amount of water well. 

Also, ensure that the soil remains moist but well-drained until the new plants are rooting.

If you are looking for clumping bamboo plants for sale, check out the link to UK retailers.

Grow clumping bamboo in the garden

This clumping bamboo is a standout in the garden the transformation of the stems from purplish brown to dark red as the culms mature.

Red Zebra is a great ornamental bamboo best planted in the front garden, along the side walkways or where the culms are visible.

Award-winning bamboo plants

We also featured a special group of Award-Winning Bamboo Plants

These bamboos received the RHS Merit Award in the UK and other Bamboo Awards for their notable garden features. 

If you are having difficulty selecting bamboo, this group of bamboo plants will not disappoint you. 

Fargesia murielae Red Zebra bamboo ideal pot plant

To make the work lighter, always select the right pots before planting your bamboo plants. 

The best pots for planting bamboos have stable bases and wide tops. Note that it is often hard work to remove the bamboo when they’ve filled out the contained space. 

Here is a Guide to Selecting the Right Pot for planting running and clumping bamboo. Watch the video and find out the best way to grow bamboo plants in the UK.

Tall Bamboo Phyllostachys Parvifolia Loves Shade and Full Sun

Phyllostachys parvifolia is a tall bamboo that can grow to over 8m in temperate or subtropical conditions. This running bamboo has tall upright culms with thin-walled internodes. 

Its shoot has a purplish tint over brown sheaths giving it a rather calm slender appearance. The shoots can grow 5m to 6m before putting out branches. 
It is an invasive bamboo. Grow in contained barriers, or in pots and containers. An ideal option for tall screens and garden hedges.

General description

  • Name: Phyllostachys parvifolia.
  • Foliage: Evergreen
  • Culm: Upright, woody thin-walled.
  • Height: 8 - 12m, tall bamboo.
  • Spread: Running bamboo, invasive.

Growth requirement

  • Site: Part shade to full sun, temperate/subtropical bamboo
  • Soil: Well-drained moist or damp soil.
  • Hardiness: – 10 to –5 degrees Celsius.
  • Use: Woodland forest, walkway, large garden hedge, tall privacy screen.
How to propagate bamboo in water - seeds, culms and rhizomes cuttings Different ways of growing running bamboo plants

How to propagate running bamboo Phyllostachys parvifolia?

In the UK, many growers use Rhizome Cuttings to propagate the running bamboo successfully. 

You can also use Culm Cuttings or Bamboo Seeds to propagate Phyllostachys parvifolia. 

Seeds are often hard to find because bamboos can flower once every 10 – 20 years. 

This bamboo, in particular, relies on wind pollination, unless it is hand-pollinated it can be really hard to get the seeds. 

If you are lucky to have a rare bamboo seed, take extra care to grow them. 

Check out this step-by-step guide on How to Grow Bamboo from Seeds.

Video Tips for propagating tall bamboo from seed

Buy Running Bamboo for screening and hedging

Phyllostachys parvifolia bamboo is an ideal privacy screen for apartments, balconies, porches or any small outdoor space. 

It is also an ideal garden hedge plant because you can prune the leaves and new shoots to give it a neat appearance. 

Here are some great places where you can buy the running bamboos for screening and hedging.

Running bamboo types similar to Phyllostachys parvifolia

Finding tall running bamboo at the local nursery or garden centre can be hard. 

Therefore we provide 5 alternative bamboos that are similar to the Phyllostachys parvifolia. 

The similarities are based on 5 important factors: the type (either running or clumping), height, foliage, hardiness and use

Tall Bamboo Phyllostachys Parvifolia Loves Shade and Full Sun

All in all, Phyllostachys parvifolia is a fantastic tall subtropical bamboo plant. 

This tall running bamboo is perfect for large ornamental gardens, woodland forests, walkways and tall privacy screens.

It will thrive in pots and containers where the soil is well-drained and moist. 


At G.B.P, our goal is to provide the right information for selecting the right bamboo to grow in the garden and in pots and containers. 

Based on our experience, we also offer bamboo growers tips and guides on how to provide the right care and maintenance for bamboo plants. 

You can see most of our work on YouTube.

Grow Clumping Fargesia murielae 'Ivory Ibis'

Fargesia murielae 'Ivory Ibis ' is a clump-forming umbrella bamboo. This bamboo is a standout, it has upright dense culms and ivory evergreen foliage. 
It is an ideal choice for a formidable natural hedge or privacy screen. 
Bamboo Ivory Ibis is an undemanding bamboo hardy to -25 degrees Celsius and can also tolerate prolonged dry periods. Excellent bamboo for pots and containers, too.

General description

  • Name: Fargesia murielae ‘Ivory Ibis’, Umbrella bamboo 'Ivory Ibis'
  • Foliage: Evergreen, white shade on leaves (ivory).
  • Culm: Upright, green stem, dense.
  • Height: 3 - 4m, medium height bamboo, can be pruned.
  • Spread: 2 - 3m, clump-forming.

Growth requirement

  • Site: Shade, part shade to full sun.
  • Soil: Clay and heavy soil (prefer well-drained moist soil)
  • Hardiness: – 25 to –20 degrees Celsius.
  • Use: Individual plant, pots, hedge, privacy screen.

Buy Fargesia murielae Ivory Ibis

Ivory Ibis bamboo is an ideal plant for privacy screening apartments, balconies, porches or any small outdoor place. 

It is also an ideal hedge plant in the garden because you can prune the leaves and new shoots. 

You can get more information on bamboo plants, tools and natural bamboo products from the renowned UK Home and Garden retailers we work with. 

5 Fargesia murielae bamboos similar to ‘Ivory Ibis’

Finding this bamboo at the local nursery or garden centre can be hard, therefore we provide 5 alternative bamboos that are similar to the ‘Ivory Ibis’. 

The similarities are based on 5 important factors: Fargesia bamboo, similar height, similar foliage, and similar hardiness and can be used as a hedging screen.
  1. 'Red Zebra'
  2. 'Dino'
  3. 'Blue Lizard'
  4. 'Blue Dargon'
  5. 'Frosty Bamboo'

Fargesia Blue Dragon Bamboo how to grow

We also featured a special group of Award-Winning Bamboo Plants
These bamboos received the RHS Merit Award in the UK and other Bamboo Awards for their notable garden features. 

If you are having difficulty selecting bamboo, this group of bamboo plants will not disappoint you.

Working with bamboos

The clumping bamboo plants such as the 'Ivory Ibis' are non-invasive bamboos, however, clumpers in pots and containers will require repotting after 4 or 5 years. 

Many bamboo growers will attest to the fact that it is often hard work removing the bamboo from a pot or container when they’ve filled out the space. 

To make the work lighter, always select the right pots before planting your bamboo plants. 

The Fargesia group of bamboos are generally well-behaved, however, the underground bamboo parts expand around the base. 

This clumping habit is visible as the new shoots grow into culms and the underground base buds thicken. 

The culms of the Ivory Ibis will definitely require thinning and pruning after the first 3 years because of their dense culm clusters. 

This is the ideal time to prune the whole plant and get new plant divisions and bamboo sticks

clumping bamboo plants UK Examples of bamboo sticks in use in pots and patio

Fargesia murielae Ivory Ibis

All in all, the Fargesia murielae ‘Ivory Ibis’ is an excellent bamboo for hedging and privacy screens. 

Its dense upright culms and thick foliage are the perfect features for creating a natural dense cover. 

At G.B.P, our goal is to provide the right information for selecting the right bamboo to grow in the garden and in pots and containers. 

Based on our experience, we also offer bamboo growers’’ tips and guides on how to provide the right care and maintenance for bamboo plants. 

You can see most of our work on YouTube.

How to Grow Edible bamboo Plants - Incense Bamboo

Bamboo shoots from a small group of bamboo are edible. If you are thinking of growing a bamboo plant and also enjoy the shoots, Incense bamboo is one great option.

It's a great bamboo that does well in waterlogged areas and produces new shoots in abundance. Check out the full info on Incense Bamboo.

phyllostachys atrovaginata Incense edible Bamboo Phyllostachys atrovaginata (Incense Edible Bamboo)  

How to grow Incense Bamboo?

Plant in contained spaces

Phyllostachys atrovaginata is a massive plant to grow in pots and containers, but its edible shoots and scented leaves are adorable features many bamboo enthusiasts cannot ignore. 

Use large heavy-duty container pots to grow this timber bamboo. Note that the new shoots in the second, third and successive years will be reasonably taller than the first shoots. 

So, do not be surprised if your Phyllostachys atrovaginata is taller than an average Phyllostachys bamboo in the container pots. 

This running bamboo will definitely require repotting within 3 – 5 years.


Plant in the garden

Phyllostachys atrovaginata’s tall dark shoots, thick upright stems and distinct incense are excellent for creating a calm and serene atmosphere outdoors or in the garden. 

Also a preferable bamboo for large botanical gardens, woodland forests, walkways and tall privacy screens. 

Perhaps it's important to note that the Phyllostachys atrovaginata Incense Bamboo is an invasive Timber Bamboo. 

Therefore building a bamboo barrier prior to planting it in the garden is the best thing to do. Here are tips for building a Formidable Bamboo Barrier in the Garden

Unlike the other running and clumping bamboo, the Incense Bamboo can grow in soggy soil. 

This bamboo has long hollow (straw-like) roots that can penetrate deep into the soggy soil, and enable it to absorb vital nutrients it requires to survive. 

So, if you want to grow bamboo near a soggy site, the Phyllostachys atrovaginata is the ideal bamboo.

UK Bamboo Plants for Sale 
Large Bamboos for temperate and subtropical areas

Propagate Phyllostachys atrovaginata Incense Bamboo

By rhizome cuttings

In the UK, many growers use Rhizome Cuttings to propagate the running bamboo successfully. 

By seed propagation

You can also use Culm Cuttings or Bamboo Seeds to propagate Phyllostachys atrovaginata. 

Seeds are often hard to find because bamboos rarely flower. If you are lucky to have a rare bamboo seed, take extra care to grow them. 

Here is a step-by-step guide on How to Propagate Bamboos from Seeds

By air layering

Air layering is another technique used successfully to propagate temperate and subtropical large bamboo plants such as the Timber Bamboos. 

This is like budding, instead, put some garden compost under the bamboo branch and cover it to promote root growth before transplanting. 

Though we have not tried it yet, we have seen people doing it successfully in the US and Australia.

Is bamboo sustainable?

What makes bamboo sustainable as raw material, and are bamboo products sustainable? 

Two factors that stand out in the discussion of bamboo as a sustainable raw material are how fast it grows and its re-generative growth behaviour

is bamboo sustainable?

Is bamboo sustainable?

Bamboo is the (if not the) fastest-growing plant in a day. 

This is true according to the Guinness World Records Book. 

In natural conditions, bamboo plants can grow at an average rate of 91cm per day

At gardenbambooplants.com, we measured a typical Yellow Bamboo (Phyllostachys Areosulcata Aureculatis) to investigate how fast this bamboo grows in the UK in one growth year. 

We found out that it grew 1.43cm per day. This is fast compared to other garden and pot plants. 

Also, it can take 3 – 5 years for bamboo to reach maturity. 

This is why these plants are sustainable – they grow and regenerate fast. 

The cycle of bamboo life and it lifespan is highly sustainable.

 

Why are bamboo accessories eco-friendly?

Bamboos can break down into soil very quickly. 

Some reports have indicated that it takes just 3 years for bamboo to decompose. 

Therefore, they are eco-friendly. 

Some accessories are 100% plant-based, including bamboo home accessories. 

For example, bamboo toothbrushes have soft bristles which are eco-friendly. But, some toothbrushes and electric toothbrush heads still have nylon bristles. 

Other products that have a combination of bamboo and other recycled materials include the stainless steel used on shavers and plastic and silicon suctions used in kids plates

The development, manufacture and use the bamboo products is a promising start. Users have to be content because, at the least, these products are 90% eco-friendly. They are safe for the environment.

Why use bamboo home accessories?

The bamboo accessories are durable and long-lasting. 

One of the best things about bamboo accessories is that you’ll see their true beauty as they mature. 

The deep brown colour becomes prominent and gives it a peculiar, but stunning bamboo appearance. 

The downside is that bamboo home accessories are susceptible to wear and tear. 

In fact, like many other home accessories, they will wear in time. Perhaps it is important to note that bamboo accessories are biodegradable. 

And will turn to soil very quickly, whereas the other plastic kitchen accessories will *not* decompose.

Understandably, bamboo and wood products are biodegradable. 
Yet the growth behaviour of bamboo plants makes it a more desirable sustainable material.


Watch the video on how to connect the NEW LPG gas regulator to the gas cylinder

 

How to grow red bamboo plants?

Red bamboo plants are a stunning group of plants, though not so common as the black bamboo plants. 

Most of the red bamboo plants are from the clumping variety. 

Check out these articles for the 5 best read bamboo plants that grow well in the UK, US, Canada, Australia and other parts of the temperate regions where there are four seasons.

ways to grow red bamboo plants - red pandas eat bamboo?


Grow red bamboo plants in the garden

Bamboos are evergreen and long-lasting, best grown in sites where they’ll provide a permanent cover such as in the garden as ornamental plants, or along the boundary as hedges and privacy screens. 

The red bamboos are a standout. 

So, grow them somewhere obvious where you will admire them all year round. 

It is a good idea to use root barriers if you are growing the running red bamboo plants because this will stop them from spreading. 

Alternatively, grow them in pots. See below why growing bamboo plants in pots is a great idea.

Grow red bamboo plants pot?

The red bamboos are fantastic pot plants. Though these plants do not flower regularly, the red canes are naturally beautiful.
  • Movable

Most bamboos in pots are not easy to move because they are large and heavy plants. 

The red bamboo plants will require additional help or tool to move them around, like this Hand Truck from B&Q. 

However, the great thing about growing bamboo in pots is that you CAN actually move and adjust the pots to your heart’s desire with a bit of help.
  • Maintainable

Bamboos are undemanding plants. 

You can prune the culms and leave the greenery you want on the potted bamboos, and they’ll keep producing new shoots year on year. 
That is why they are great natural privacy plants.
  • Protection

Bamboo plants are hardy and can withstand cold and frosts. 

Though they are generally tolerant to insects and bugs, the new shoots are susceptible to slug attacks. 

So, growing them in pots and elevating them above the ground is the best protection.
  • Root barriers

The red running and clumping bamboos are either invasive or will expand at the base. 

Either use the large heavy pots or root barrier to stop them from spreading.
  • Indoor and patio plants

Bamboos in pots can be used as natural screens for balconies, patios, porches, and verandas. 

They also provide a calm and relaxing atmosphere for the outdoor sitting areas and are good conversation starters when friends and family visit you. 

You can grow the red bamboo in the garden and use root barriers to stop them from spreading. 

Alternatively, you can use the pots to grow these bamboos. 

Either way, the red bamboos will give your garden and home a different but natural appearance.

What Clumping Bamboos to Grow - Umbrella Plants

Umbrella bamboo plants have tall stems and ‘dense foliage'. 

They are clumping bamboo plants.

The thick arching foliage of these bamboos forms a formidable over-hanging shape like an umbrella, thus the name Umbrella Bamboo

Their new shoots grow very fast before putting out branches. These bamboo plants tend to reach a height of about 4 to 6 metres, ideal for heavy top-hedge screening.

For example, these bamboos can be used to provide an evergreen cover (or screen) for boundaries, walls and low buildings. 

 Here are 5 tall bamboo plants with an average height of 6 metres and produce the evergreen ‘umbrella’ effect.

Umbrella clumping bamboo privacy plants 6 metres

Most umbrella-clumping bamboo plants grow to 6 metres and are much denser than running bamboo. 

They thrive in the UK climate. 

The bamboo plants listed above are predominantly clump-forming with either thicker culms or produce masses of culms in Spring. 

As the name suggests, the clumping bamboo canes (culms) tend to grow into a tight cluster around the parent plant, forming a formidable tight screen. 

The foliages of matured umbrella bamboo arch into an umbrella shape. 

Unlike the upright bamboos, this special group of bamboos is the best choice for privacy.

umbrella plants

 

Clumping umbrella bamboo plants form thick covers

If you are planting bamboo to provide privacy from a short wall or the neighbour's shed, the clump-forming bamboos are the best options. 

However, you may have to buy more than one plant to provide a good cover.
As a rule of thumb, plant the clump-forming bamboo no more than 1.5 metres to give you are dense hedging screen.

Here are the 5 umbrella bamboo plants that form clusters of ‘dense-culms'. 

They are ideal for growing in the garden or in pots and containers. One top tip is to grow these bamboo plants in pots for balcony or patio privacy. 

Choose the bamboo according to the height specification - click here to find out more.

Quick links to bamboo plants for privacy and hedging

What kind of bamboo is best for privacy? 
Depending on what you like, here are some suggestions of living bamboo plants for creating an ideal privacy space.
The umbrella bamboo plants are the best option for privacy screening. 

They are undemanding plants but will provide the cover you need for a long time. 

If you have any questions about the umbrella bamboo, leave a comment below and we'll get back to you.