Showing posts with label Tall Garden Plants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tall Garden Plants. Show all posts

Phyllostachys Aurea Golden Bamboo [Fishpole Bamboo]

Phyllostachys aurea Fishpole Golden Bamboo is an all-rounder, slim running bamboo, that grows well in shade, part shade and sun, with spectacular evergreen slender leaves and light green stems that mature to golden yellow.

This is one of the best bamboo plants to grow for garden bamboo sticks because of its thick and slender tall stems.

phyllostachys aurea UK

 

Golden Bamboo Phyllostachys aurea UK sales

The RHS has recognised Phyllostachys aurea for its outstanding garden features.

Check out the UK bamboo suppliers.

  • Identification: Phyllostachys aurea, Fishpole Bamboo, Golden Bamboo.
  • Site: Tolerant bamboo, grows in full sun to partial shade and shade.
  • Soil: Prefers moist and well-drained loose soil (sand and loam), doesn’t like compacted soil.
  • Uses: Excellent for hedging, screening, windbreak, or pots and containers.
  • Winter hardiness: Hardy to - 20 degrees Celsius.
  • Height: Fast-growing plant, 2 – 4m.
  • Spread: Running bamboo, allow space to spread or contain in large pots.
  • Foliage: Light green to yellow foliage all year round.
  • Stem: Slender bright green matures to golden yellow in full sun.
best bamboo sticks for plants in pots and garden Phyllostachys aurea gives the best garden sticks

Uses Phyllostachys aurea Fishpole Bamboo

Although the fishpole bamboo is tolerant to shade, it grows well in part shade and sun. 

Sufficient sunlight will result in a significant transformation in the colour of the culms (stems) and foliage from green to golden yellow. 

This running bamboo behaves more like the clump-forming bamboo in the UK where it is cooler. Here are two other running bamboo plants that act like clumpers.

However, the rhizomes are invasive where the soil is loose and rich in moisture and nutrients, so grow it where there is enough space for them to grow.

The Phyllostachys aurea is an ideal bamboo for hedging, privacy screening and windbreak in the garden. It is also an excellent bamboo plant for medium to large pots and containers.

Notably, it does not like soggy soil and it definitely does not like compacted soil. It prefers well-drained loamy soil, loose and rich in moisture.

Propagate  Phyllostachys aurea

Bamboo growers are propagating Phyllostachys aurea from seeds and rhizome cuttings, and base separation.

However, bamboo seeds are often hard to buy near you because they do not flower regularly.

The 2 best ways to propagate Phyllostachys aurea

  • is by base separation and
  • from rhizome and culm cuttings.

This video shows the work we did at Garden Bamboo Plants UK.

Phyllostachys aurea Grow and Care Tips

The new growth will require care and attention. 

Slugs adore the tender new growths, they can wipe off the fresh leaves in one visit if left unprotected.

If you are propagating bamboo plants either from the rhizome or culm cuttings or planting a recent purchase, protect the new growths by adding Slug and Snail Killer. 

(Check out where to buy Bamboo and bamboo supplies)

Perhaps it is important to note that despite its clump-forming nature, the Phyllostachys aurea is a running bamboo.

The bamboo's horizontal rhizomes can spread to an average of 4m if left unchecked. It is best to give it space to grow.

Alternatively surround the roots with root barriers to restrict the rhizomes from spreading.

Better to grow Phyllostachys aurea where there is enough space, away from strong wind. 

It can also be grown in large pots and containers to contain its spreading.

Facts about Phyllostachys aurea

The matured Fishpole Golden bamboo will thrive in well-drained loamy soil with high moisture and nutrient contents.

Like most bamboo plants in the UK, they do not like compacted dry soils such as new building sites or roads and pathways.

In addition, the matured bamboos thrive on what is available in the soil, they will occasionally need feed and water. 

A regular check is recommended if you are growing them in containers.

The browning of the culms or yellowing of the leaves are signs of the plant in distress. Here is an article on how to revive your bamboo plants where they show signs of distress.

Check the soil by inspection or digging to 10 cm depth to find out if the soil is too dry. Add, mulch fertiliser or any plant feed if necessary.

If your Phyllostachys aurea plant outgrows the container and shows distressing signs, it is calling for you to separate the plants and re-pot them.

Also, prune the old culms ideally in early Spring for the new growth to take over.

We invite you to check out our YouTube Channel – Amazing Bamboo Plants.

Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo [Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis]

Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo [Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis] is a tall and thick running bamboo, best for tall hedges and screens. 

The golden stems have spectacular bright green stripes running vertically along the internode. This stunning bamboo is an all-rounder, you can grow it as a standalone plant,  garden centrepiece or tall screen. 

Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis is an RHS Merit Award-winning bamboo, that grows well in a mild temperate climate.

Buy bamboo plants and root barriers from UK suppliers here.

Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo 

Common Features

  • Identification: Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis, Golden Chinese Timber Bamboo, Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo.
  • Site: Grows well in full sun to partial shade.
  • Soil: Well-drained loam soil, moist.
  • Uses: Excellent for hedging, screening or large pots and containers. Do not do well in windy sites.
  • Winterhardiness: Hardy to – 15 degrees Celsius.
  • Height: a tall bamboo 10 - 12m.
  • Spread: running bamboo (behaves like clumping bamboo in a temperate climate), 4 – 6m
  • Foliage: Evergreen tall foliage
  • Cane colour: spectacular green stripes, yellow, bright to matured dark orangey yellow.

Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo Tall Screen

Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo is an ideal bamboo plant for a tall hedge or natural privacy screen. The tall dense growth and golden yellow bamboo cluster are prominent outdoors.

This large tall bamboo (Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis) is a recipient of the prestigious RHS Merit Awards, one of the award-winning Phyllostachys bamboo plants.

The others include

  • 1. Phyllostachys aurea,
  • 2. Phyllostachys Aureaculata bissettii, and
  • 3. Phyllostachys nigra.

Propagate Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo [Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis]

Although the Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo is a low-maintenance plant, the new growth will require care and attention. 

Slugs can wipe off the fresh leaves in one visit if left unprotected.

If you are propagating bamboo plants either from the rhizome or cane cuttings or planting a recent purchase, protect the new growths by adding Slug and Snail Killer.

Care

The Golden Yellow Cane Bamboo can spread to an average of 6 metres (or more) during a humid Spring or hot Summer. 

This running bamboo needs space to grow. Always grow this bamboo in barriers to stop spreading.

The new rhizomes and canes can reach their full spread and height, respectively, during a warm Spring or hot Summer.

Although Phyllostachys vivax f. aureocaulis varieties are undemanding, a fully grown bamboo will require attention because it's invasive.

The plants thrive in the cooler temperate climate where there is well-drained loamy soil high in moisture and nutrient contents. Like most bamboo plants in the UK, they do not grow well in compacted soil.

Maintain tall bamboo plants

This tall bamboo with dense evergreen foliage is susceptible to heavy snowfall and strong wind. To protect from falling, use strong ropes to tie them back.

You can contain the Golden Chinese Timer Bamboo in large pots and containers. 

This impressive bamboo may not grow to its full height in contained spaces, but planted in nutrient-rich soil with good moisture, it will surely exhibit its best features.

Here is a video to show you how to provide support for tall bamboo.


Phyllostachys edulis Moso Bamboo [Tall Bamboo Plant]

 Phyllostachys edulis Moso Bamboo is also referred to as Phyllostachys pubescens or Tortoise-shell bamboo. Moso bamboo is a very tall running bamboo.

Moso bamboo is a running bamboo which means it can spread quickly.

It can grow to 10 metres in European weather. A stunning large bamboo plant, ideal for a walkthrough, large garden and woodland forest.

 Phyllostachys edulis Moso Bambo for Sale

The giant timber bamboo plants are hard to find in pots online. Some UK suppliers may sell them on request or source them for you. 

Here is where to buy Giant Timber bamboo plants onlineWe listed some top UK Home and Garden bamboo suppliers like Crocus and YouGarden.

Also, check out Amazon bamboo suppliers.

Moso Bamboo UK, Canada, US, Japan

Edulis Moso Bamboo features

  • Identification: Phyllostachys edulis, Moso Bamboo, Tortoise-shell Bamboo.
  • Site: Full sun to partial shade.
  • Soil: sand and clay or loam soil.
  • Uses: Walkthrough, large garden, woodland forest.
  • Temperature hardiness: - 20°C.
  • Height: Very tall bamboo, 8 - 10m.
  • Spread: Large running bamboo.
  • Foliage: Evergreen Bamboo.
  • Culm colour: Silver grey to light green, matures to yellow.

Grow Chinese Moso Bamboo

The Edulis Chinese Moso Bamboo is one of the largest Phyllostachys bamboo plants. It grows well in temperate to sub-tropical regions where the average temperature is 10 degrees Celsius.

This running bamboo is recorded to have grown over 3 metres in a day. It is among the fast-growing bamboo.

An amazing bamboo, it can reach its full height in the first 3 -5 years and remain evergreen for more than 10 years.

The Edulis Moso Bamboo brings the semi-tropical feeling to large gardens and open woodland spaces. 

It is a stunning bamboo that stands out wherever it is planted and does well as an individual plant.

The best to plant it out in the garden is early Spring as the new tips and leaves are growing.

Moso Bamboo Care

Although the Moso Bamboo is hardy to -20 degrees Celsius, it is susceptible to very cold weather, frozen soil, heavy snow, and particularly, strong wind.

The leaves will turn brown and fall off the stems if the weather gets below the UK Zone 7 temperature range.

In addition, the tall frames of this bamboo will struggle to support its height and weight if it grows in areas where there are strong winds. Therefore, carefully select a site away from the direct wind.

(Check out the Japanese Timber Bamboo 'Midake', a Bamboo that shares the same features as Moso Bamboo).

The matured Edulis Moso Bamboo plants are undemanding, they’ll thrive in clay, sand, or loamy soil once the roots and rhizomes are established in the soil.

However, it is important to monitor the growth of this large bamboo. It can get messy if left unchecked. Apply mulch early in Spring to promote new growths.

Alternatively, adding mulch in Autumn may be required to protect the top layer from frost and cold if you expect a cooler Winter.

Propagate Chinese Moso Bamboo Seeds, Base-culms  and Cuttings

Get the Moso Bamboo Seed on Amazon.

You can propagate the tall Chinese Moso Bamboos in three ways: by calm-base separation, seeds propagation or rhizome and culms cuttings.

The Moso Bamboo will demand your attention because it is a large bamboo.

Seeds are hard to find in the UK. So, check at your local nurseries, garden centres or online marketplaces that may have the seeds. 

To give the bamboo seeds the best chance to grow, plant them in a propagating medium before transplanting them into holding pots and to the soil where they’ll grow.

If you take out a mature plant with the root hairs and rhizomes intact, you can put it straight into the ground where it’ll grow.

Large Bamboo Plants to grow in the UK

In the UK, this ginormous bamboo is known to grow at a rate of 20 cm a day and reach an average height of  10 metres. 

The new shoots can extend 5 to 8 metres before putting out branches and leaves. The Moso Bamboo are amazing Phyllostachys.

Specimen of this bamboo can be seen in the beautiful Kew Gardens London or the Trebeh Gardens Cornwall.

Check out the popular bamboo plants in the UK, including the Phyllostachys group of bamboo.

Bambusoideae Phyllostachys Bambusoides [Japanese Timber Bamboo]

 Phyllostachys bambusoides is a large, tall bamboo from the sub-family Bambusoideae. 

It grows to over 10m in height, ideal for a walkthrough, large garden, or woodland forest. 

This running bamboo is also called Giant Timber Bamboo (other names include Medake and Japanese Timber Bamboo).

Bambusoideae Timber Bamboo for Sale

The giant timber bamboo plants are hard to find in pots online. Some UK suppliers may sell them on request or source them for you. 

Here is where to buy Giant Timber bamboo plants online. We listed some top UK Home and Garden bamboo suppliers like Crocus and YouGarden.

We list some Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds suppliers on Amazon. 

Bambusoideae Bambusoides Japanese Timber Bamboo

Phyllostachys Bambusoides (Bambusoideae) Features

  • Name: Phyllostachys bambusoides, Madake, Giant Timber bamboo, Japanese Timber Bamboo
  • Site: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil: Prefers fertile and well-drained, moist soil
  • Uses: Walkthrough, woodland forest, large garden.
  • Winterhardiness: - 10 to – 15 degrees Celsius.
  • Height: 15 - 20m, tall upright bamboo.
  • Spread: 5 – 7m, running bamboo.
  • Foliage: Evergreen Bamboo with spectacular slender long leaves.
  • Culm colour: Thick woody stems, green to golden yellow when matures.

Grow Phyllostachys Bambusoides Japanese Timber Bamboo

The Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo belongs to the bamboo sub-family Bambusoideae, known widely as the Phyllostachys Bambusoides, Japanese Timber Bamboo or Medake.

This impressive bamboo is one of the largest bamboo plants that adapt to the temperate region. 

It thrives in full sun to part shade where the soil is moist but well-drained. Ideal plant for large botanical gardens, walkthroughs and woodland forests.

The Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo loves mild temperatures and high ceilings if grown indoors. 

Alternatively, keep it in pots and containers and place it on the patio or terrace where there is enough sunlight.

The giant timber bamboo plants also thrive in contained spaces and will be reasonably taller than other Phyllostachys varieties. Therefore, take its spread and height into consideration, before choosing a site for planting.

The Giant Timber bamboo and Edulis Moso Bamboo are the two common bamboo plants from the gigantic sub-family Bambusoideae. P. bambusoides can grow in the temperate European climate, including the warmer parts of the UK.

Specimens of these two large bamboo plants can be seen at the beautiful Kew Gardens London or the Trebeh Gardens Cornwall.

Protect tall bamboo plants

The Timber Bamboo is hardy to – 20 degrees Celsius, but unlike its large cousin the Moso Bamboo mentioned earlier here, this bamboo does not like the cold. 

This giant bamboo is susceptible to frost and frozen soil. Prolonged temperatures below 0 degrees Celsius can completely damage this giant.

To save your bamboo from any irreparable damage, add a thick layer of organic mulch or move it to a sheltered site where the cold and frost will not affect it.

Act quickly if you see the browning of leaves or culms. 

If they are growing in pots, cut the long culms and put the plants in a sheltered site. That way, the plant will survive and put out new growth in Spring.

Propagate Giant Timber Bamboo

There are three ways to propagate bamboo plants – from the seeds, by culm and rhizome cuttings, or by separation of the main culm base.

Some people have successfully used conventional ‘Layering’ as the fourth way to propagate large bamboo. 

However, propagating bamboos from the cuttings and by separation is, by far, the two popular ways to get successful plants in the UK.

We list some Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds supplies on Amazon. 

Phyllostachys bambusoides (Japanese Timber Bamboo)

The Phyllostachys bambusoides (Giant Japanese Timber Bamboo) can be hard to find in the UK. 

The best places to see these impressive evergreen bamboo plants are the botanical gardens. Kew Gardens and Trebeh Gardens.

Check at your local Garden Centres or Nursery and ask for the Phyllostachys bambusoides. Or mention the names Medake, Giant Timber Bamboo, and Japanese Timber Bamboo.

Why Phyllostachys aurea called Fish-pole Golden Bamboo Plant?

Phyllostachys aurea bamboo plant is one of my favourite bamboos. Its stems are small, tall, bendable and strong. The stems are perfect fishing poles. In the UK, they are ideal garden sticks.

Phyllostachys aurea UK
Phyllostachys aurea

Fish-pole Golden Bamboo

The Phyllostachys aurea bamboo plants have thick inner stem walls which means the stems are strong but flexible. 
The stems have been used as fishing poles in China and other parts of Asia and the Pacific regions for centuries. That is why the Phyllostachys aurea bamboo has been called the Fish-pole Golden Bamboo. 
Today many gardeners are using the tough Fish-pole Golden bamboo canes as sticks for staking plants in the garden and pots. 

Their tough and flexible canes are ideal for making climbing frames and sticks for pot plants and other garden plants that needed support. 
The sticks are not too big like the Bamboo Vivax poles or too small like some clumping bamboos seen in the UK. They are just the right bamboo for garden and pots & containers.

We created a list of some top UK bamboo sellers online. Check them out on our website.

Phyllostachys aurea in UK Garden

Video of fish-pole bamboo in our garden

Uses of Phyllostachys aurea called Fish-pole Golden Bamboo Plant

Here are some ways in which we used the Phyllostachys aurea Fish-pole Golden Bamboo Plant in the garden - visit our YouTube channel for more videos on the uses of bamboo sticks in the garden.

Tomato plants trellis frame

Garden Fruit Netting

Know more about Phyllostachys aurea bamboo

The Fish-pole Golden Yellow Bamboo is one of my favourite bamboo plants. 

When you know this bamboo plant personally, you'll understand why it is popular among many bamboo growers in the UK.

Its stems are great garden sticks. 

Bendable, you can make any shape with it. 

Re-usable, you can use a stick for many years.

Here is more to learn about this bamboo plant:

Is black bamboo running or clumping?

Phyllostachys nigra black bamboo, commonly called the Black Bamboo, is an invasive bamboo but also behaves like a clumping bamboo in a cooler climate. 

This running bamboo can spread quickly if left unchecked. Such occurrence shows that some of the common bamboo species can be tricky to identify if you do not pay close attention to the rhizome formations. 

It is difficult to tell running bamboo from the clumping bamboo just by looking at its appearance. The best way to identify bamboo is by closer inspection. Check out the two articles to help you identify bamboos like a pro:
Black Bamboo Plants UK Phyllostachys nigra running bamboos, but can behave like clumping bamboos.

Is black bamboo running or clumping?

Black bamboo is running bamboo. 

It is an invasive variety and will spread quickly. 

Always use a root barrier to grow black bamboo plants. Or grow them in heavy-duty pots and containers.

Buying black bamboo plants

Bamboo plants from garden shops and online marketplaces like eBay and Amazon have clear labels. 
We made a list of UK home and garden retailers that have black bamboo for sales - suggest checking these renowned UK garden shops. 
This makes it easy to buy bamboo. However, mix-ups are likely when buying bamboo plants online and also in stores. 

Whether you are buying bamboo seeds or potted bamboo plants, it is always the right thing to read the labels properly. 

Also, read the reviews and plant descriptions before making a purchase. 


Click here to check out the collection of Clumping and Running bamboo plants from the Home & Garden retailers in the UK.

Bamboo fast-growing evergreen hedge plants?

Bamboos are not the only fast-growing hedge plants. The other fast-growing shrubs for hedging and privacy screening. They are great alternatives to traditional hedge plants like the Green Leylandii, Photinia, Red Robin, Western Red Cedar, Portuguese Laurel and Beech.

The hedging shrubs are evergreen and retain their foliage all year round, while the others are deciduous and lose their leaves in Autumn. 

Many of the hedging trees and shrubs require pruning and mulching to provide neat covers or they’ll grow tall uncontrollably. 

Bamboos are fast-growing, if not the fastest, among the hedging and screening plants. 

In addition, the bamboos are a standout because they come in different varieties. 
We will identify what makes bamboos a good option for hedging, but first, you may be interested in this article that let’s compare the growth rate of 6 common hedging shrubs and trees in the UK.

Bamboo plants are great alternatives to traditional hedge plants like  Green Leylandii Photinia Red Robin Western Red Cedar Portuguese Laurel Beech.
 

Why use bamboos as a hedging plant?

The bamboos are a group of special hedging plants. 

They will grow fast, reach a certain height and remain evergreen for many years. They have been used extensively in modern landscaping and garden designs to great effects. 

Growing at 2 – 5 ft or 60 - 150cm per year, bamboo is the option for quick hedging. It is fast-growing, evergreen and stands out as the only grass plant for hedging. 

There are, in fact, many varieties of clumping and running bamboos that are suitable for both home and garden hedging. 

Furthermore, these plants come in various sizes, shapes and colours perfect for tall and short hedges. You can trim some bamboos to give a neat hedge while others may not require any trimming at all.

What are the best bamboo plants for hedging?

Although the running bamboo plants are invasive, growing them in contain structures or pots and containers are ideal containment measures. 

Alternatively, choose the clumping bamboos as they are the better options for dense hedges. 

So, if you are looking for a better alternative to the common trees and shrubs and other hedging plants, bamboo hedges are great options.

All You Need to Know About Selecting Bamboo Plants is a guide that will lead you to the right bamboo depending on your preferences. So, check it out and download the PDF version.


easy guide for selecting bamboo hedging plants UK

Pros and cons of bamboo hedge plants

As a grass variety, bamboos have slim culms, are tall, and slender and tend to grow in masses providing dense evergreen foliage covers all year round. 

But, the running bamboo varieties are invasive and spread very quickly putting out lots of shoots and rhizomes every year. 

This is one of the major reasons why many homeowners and gardeners do not want to grow bamboo hedges. 

Many homeowners who inherited bamboo may find it overwhelming to control the bamboo. These neglected bamboos will require a lot of work to remove

They are like a rowdy toddler if you neglect them. 

However, the pros of growing bamboo far outweigh the cons. 

Bamboo plants are formidable hedges. You have to select them carefully, choose the ideal site and care for them as they grow just like the other hedging plants.

How to grow a bamboo hedge?

Clumping bamboos will need spacing of less than a metre in between them. As the clumpers grow, they’ll cover the spaces and provide a formidable hedge. 

The clumpers are perfect for low hedges. 
You’ll have to buy enough clumping bamboo to give you a good hedge or alternatively split the bamboo potted plants so that you can get the thick hedge. 
The running bamboos will spread and ultimately form a dense hedge within 2 to 3 years and reach matured height in 10 to 20 years. 

So, space them out at least a metre to 1.5 metres apart. 

Reassuringly, you do not have to worry about how far to space them. Once the bamboos grow, you can then move them around to cover the gaps.

Care for bamboo hedges

As mentioned earlier, not all bamboos will require trimming. 

They grow to a certain height (called the matured height) and remain that way for 10 – 20 years. 

Whereas other bamboos can be pruned to give a neat appearance. Either way, it boils down to selecting the right bamboo that suits you. 

 The common bamboo care and maintenance include:
  • thinning,
  • mulching,
  • pruning,
  • fertilising,
  • dig a trench, and
  • build boot barrier.
More details on How to Care for Your Bamboo here.

How to care for bamboo plants Provide the right care for your bamboo hedge

Must-do when growing bamboo plants

Before planting bamboo, whether it’s a runner or clumper, you should build a barrier especially when growing them as hedging plants. 

This is an important measure because as they grow, they’ll either spread (runners spread) or expand (clumpers expand). 

Barriers can be root barriers, trenches, raised beds or contained structures – any that works for you.

Tall Bamboo Phyllostachys Parvifolia Loves Shade and Full Sun

Phyllostachys parvifolia is a tall bamboo that can grow to over 8m in temperate or subtropical conditions. This running bamboo has tall upright culms with thin-walled internodes. 

Its shoot has a purplish tint over brown sheaths giving it a rather calm slender appearance. The shoots can grow 5m to 6m before putting out branches. 
It is an invasive bamboo. Grow in contained barriers, or in pots and containers. An ideal option for tall screens and garden hedges.

General description

  • Name: Phyllostachys parvifolia.
  • Foliage: Evergreen
  • Culm: Upright, woody thin-walled.
  • Height: 8 - 12m, tall bamboo.
  • Spread: Running bamboo, invasive.

Growth requirement

  • Site: Part shade to full sun, temperate/subtropical bamboo
  • Soil: Well-drained moist or damp soil.
  • Hardiness: – 10 to –5 degrees Celsius.
  • Use: Woodland forest, walkway, large garden hedge, tall privacy screen.
How to propagate bamboo in water - seeds, culms and rhizomes cuttings Different ways of growing running bamboo plants

How to propagate running bamboo Phyllostachys parvifolia?

In the UK, many growers use Rhizome Cuttings to propagate the running bamboo successfully. 

You can also use Culm Cuttings or Bamboo Seeds to propagate Phyllostachys parvifolia. 

Seeds are often hard to find because bamboos can flower once every 10 – 20 years. 

This bamboo, in particular, relies on wind pollination, unless it is hand-pollinated it can be really hard to get the seeds. 

If you are lucky to have a rare bamboo seed, take extra care to grow them. 

Check out this step-by-step guide on How to Grow Bamboo from Seeds.

Video Tips for propagating tall bamboo from seed

Buy Running Bamboo for screening and hedging

Phyllostachys parvifolia bamboo is an ideal privacy screen for apartments, balconies, porches or any small outdoor space. 

It is also an ideal garden hedge plant because you can prune the leaves and new shoots to give it a neat appearance. 

Here are some great places where you can buy the running bamboos for screening and hedging.

Running bamboo types similar to Phyllostachys parvifolia

Finding tall running bamboo at the local nursery or garden centre can be hard. 

Therefore we provide 5 alternative bamboos that are similar to the Phyllostachys parvifolia. 

The similarities are based on 5 important factors: the type (either running or clumping), height, foliage, hardiness and use

Tall Bamboo Phyllostachys Parvifolia Loves Shade and Full Sun

All in all, Phyllostachys parvifolia is a fantastic tall subtropical bamboo plant. 

This tall running bamboo is perfect for large ornamental gardens, woodland forests, walkways and tall privacy screens.

It will thrive in pots and containers where the soil is well-drained and moist. 


At G.B.P, our goal is to provide the right information for selecting the right bamboo to grow in the garden and in pots and containers. 

Based on our experience, we also offer bamboo growers tips and guides on how to provide the right care and maintenance for bamboo plants. 

You can see most of our work on YouTube.

How to maintain invasive running bamboo Phyllostachys parvifolia

Running bamboo plants are resistant to harsh conditions. However, if you see that your running bamboo plants' leaves are turning yellow are dying, you must act fast to save them.

A little care and maintenance will save your plant from dying.

why is my bamboo dying

 

How to care for dying running bamboo?

The tall running bamboo is susceptible to frost, frozen soils and poor growing conditions. 

And especially, new plants will need attention to grow and establish themselves in the first and second years. 
 So, how can you care for the dying running bamboos? 
Often plants that come in pots have lots of water and tend to thrive on plant food in the nursery. 

It is perhaps important to check the soil if you have re-potted your bamboo. 

Importantly, ensure that there is good soil and that the growing pot is not waterlogged. This could be the main reason why the leaves are turning yellow. 

Another reason why your bamboo plants are dying can be attributed to the soil where the plants are growing. Check this article for the best soil for growing bamboo

If you are satisfied that you’ve done the right thing, but your bamboo is still dying the last option is to dig the whole plant and repot it. 

Also work out whether you’ve planted the bamboo in the right site - shade, part shade or sun. 

 You could potentially lose the whole plant if you do not do anything.

In most cases, bamboo yellowing and dying are due to poor soil, waterlogged area, unconducive weather or unsuitable site. 

How to maintain invasive running bamboo

Bamboos, like other plants, will require attention to grow well. 

For the best result, maintain your running bamboo, Phyllostachys parvifolia. 

Prune and add mulch when your plants grow big.

Prune bamboo

Pruning bamboo is intensive work compared to thinning bamboo. 

Dig and remove the parts of the bamboo that have outgrown the allocated space. 

This is an ideal time to take the bamboo divisions for replanting and getting bamboo sticks for use in the garden.

Add mulch to bamboo grove

Mulching is a highly recommended care and maintenance job. 

It will keep the soil moist and protect the bamboo from frost and frozen soils. 

The bamboo leaves are fantastic mulch since they contain silicon which is naturally high in nitrogen. 

In addition, tree barks or other organic mulch rich in moisture are also good for bamboo plants.
The best time for mulching and fertilising is early in Spring before the new bamboo shoots come out, or late in Autumn when you expect cold Winter.

Buy Running Bamboo for screening and hedging

Phyllostachys parvifolia bamboo is an ideal privacy screen for apartments, balconies, porches or any small outdoor space. 

It is also an ideal garden hedge plant because you can prune the leaves and new shoots to give it a neat appearance. 

Here are some great places where you can buy the running bamboos for screening and hedging.

Tall bamboo plants UK - How to Grow Them

The tall bamboos are an ideal option for a natural privacy hedge. 

These bamboos have thick foliage and are tall, best for screening unattractive features. 

Many gardeners and homeowners prefer garden bamboo hedges because they are fast-growing. 
The dense evergreen foliage, height, spread and hardiness give the garden and out spaces a natural green appearance all year round.

Tall bamboo plants UK

 

Tall bamboo plants for privacy hedging

At GardenBambooPlants, we feature over 70 running and clumping bamboos that you can grow in the garden or in pots. 

They come in different stem colours, sizes and heights. 

If you want a natural bamboo privacy hedge, check out these 5 tall running bamboos. They are 6m or more in height.

Upright, tall and large bamboos for privacy hedge

This category is an extension of the tall garden bamboo hedging screen listed above. 

Additionally, this extra list separates the tall and upright bamboo plants from the arching plants. 

Take it as an exclusive list of only the popular Phyllostachys running bamboo plants, except the clumping bamboo Standing Stone. 

As the name implies, upright bamboo plants tend to grow straight up. 

In fact, some can reach over 6 metres if the conditions are right

Many of the tall and upright bamboo plants do well when they are planted away from the direct wind, providing the best hedge screening all year round. 
Check out the bamboo for sale in the UK at crocus.co.uk.

How to grow tall bamboo plants

Here are three options for ensuring complete control over your garden hedging privacy screens.
  • Build Raised-base: The raised base will help you to spot the rhizome tips and trim them before the tips creep into the small gaps in the pavement or the neighbour’s side.
  • Dig narrow trench 0.3m to 0.5m deep: The running bamboo rhizomes tend to grow on the top layer of the soil. As the name implies, the rhizomes are running horizontally, not deep into the soil. A narrow trench will help you to monitor the rhizomes and trim them as they grow out. The narrow trench acts as an open root barrier.
  • Plant the bamboo in large pots: If you are growing bamboo plants for balcony privacy screening, plant them in large pots or containers. This is the best way to contain the bamboo.

Guide for selecting the right garden bamboo hedging screen

So we have covered many tips and ideas and presented several suggestions for selecting bamboo for hedging garden screens. 
Here is the 'Guide' to help you make your decision! 
 Note that the questions are structured especially for you to eliminate the undesirable bamboo plants, leaving only the best option for you. 

Download the PDF version - Guide for Selecting Garden Hedging Bamboo.

Tall bamboo plants UK for hedging screens

Quick links to bamboo plants for privacy and hedging

So, what kind of bamboo is best for privacy? 

Depending on what you like, here are some suggestions of living bamboo plants for creating an ideal privacy space and garden hedge.

Where to buy tall bamboo plants?

The tall bamboo plants are great for creating a tall living screen for privacy. 

They come in different sizes and colours, too. 

Here are reliable UK retailers that sell bamboo plants and get them delivered to you.

Tall bamboo privacy hedge

The tall bamboo plants are tall plants. They are a great option for tall privacy hedges.

How fast do the giant bamboos grow in the UK?

 The giant bamboo Gigantochloa verticillate at Kew Garden grows to 2.4 metres in just 16 days.  

In Kew’s Tropical Palm House, the conditions are right for the bamboo plants. The greenhouse imitates tropical conditions, that is why the bamboo grows at this absolutely crazy rate. 

how fast do bamboo plants grow in the UK?

 The giant bamboo Gigantochloa verticillate at Kew Garden grows to 2.4 metres in just 16 days.  


How fast do the giant bamboos grow in the UK? 

To put it in perspective, the giant bamboo grows at a rate of 15 cm per day. Think about a typical classroom ruler is 30 cm, right? 

That would be how tall the bamboo grows in just 2 days. There are several factors that affect the growth of the bamboo plants such as humidity, sunlight, soil and moisture. 

As for UK bamboos, we measure the growth rate of Phyllostachys aureosulcata spectabilis in Summer (one of the common garden bamboos in the UK). 

This running bamboo grows at a rate of 1.43 cm per day. Take a look at how we measured and calculated how fast bamboo grows in a day.

Where to see the giant bamboo in the UK?

The Kew Royal Botanic Gardens is the place to see not only the Giant Timber Bamboos but also garden bamboo plants that grow in the UK.

The Kew’s Tropical Glass House is where you’ll see these three giant bamboos in all their glory. 

So, when you’re in London, visit Kew and see these adorable plants. The Bamboo Garden and Minka Japanese House have over 130 collections of bamboo plants. 

This is by far one of the largest collections of bamboo you will see near London, UK. 

The Bamboo Garden is magnificent, quiet calm and soothing. You can wander through the beautiful walkways and the arching bamboos. Or relax and listen to the rustle of bamboo leaves against the wind. 

Check out our video and image collection of the bamboos at Kew’s Tropical Glass House and Japanese Bamboo Garden.

Uses of Giant Bamboo plants

The giant bamboos are so versatile, they earn the name ‘friends of the people’. 

The bamboo sticks are used in buildings, paper making, utensils and tools, musical instruments and even for food. 

They also protect watershed areas from flooding. In mountainsides, they are important barriers to preventing soil erosion.

However, the giant bamboo natural habitats have now been lost to urbanisation and agricultural land use. 

Yet, it is often planted in stands as a source of building materials.

What Giant Bamboo Plants Grow in the UK?

They are the fastest-growing plants. Kew Royal Botanic Gardens has one of the largest collections of garden bamboos in the UK. 

At Kew’s Tropical Palm House you’ll see the giant bamboos.
  • Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo.
  • Bambusa ventricosa Buddha's Belly Bamboo.
  • Bambusa vulgaris – the Common Bamboo.
The three Giant Bamboos are a must-see. Kew Bamboo Garden also has 130 different bamboos growing naturally.

Gigantochloa verticillate Giant Bamboo


Here is what Kew said about the giant bamboo: 

The giant bamboo is the largest of all the bamboos. It grows 25-30 metres in the wild, as tall as a tree. 

This bamboo is native to Southeast Asia and the Pacific, particularly China and Papua New Guinea. In the greenhouse at Kew Gardens, this bamboo reached the top of the ceiling and had to be cut.

Bambusa ventricosa Buddha's Belly Bamboo


Another large bamboo in Kew’s Tropical Glass House is the popular Buddha's Belly Bamboo. 

Its peculiar shiny green culms are a standout – you will hardly miss it. 

The swollen or bulging internodes of its culms resemble Buddha’s fat belly which is why it earns the name Buddha's Belly Bamboo. 

The culms are deep dark green smooth and glossy with multiple branches growing at each node. 

Bambusa ventricosa (Buddha's Belly Bamboo) is probably the most peculiar-shaped bamboo that also grows in the UK. It has a clumping nature, great as a pot plant or garden plant.

Bambusa vulgaris – the Common Bamboo

This giant tropical bamboo also grows in Kew Tropical Glass House, also known as the Common Bamboo. 

An amazing bamboo with glossy green culms, large brown sheaths and hairy rims around the nodes. 

This giant timber bamboo is predominantly used for buildings and constructions and stakes for large garden plants like bananas and sugar canes.

Where to see the giant bamboo in the UK?

The Kew Royal Botanic Gardens is the place to see not only the Giant Timber Bamboos but also garden bamboo plants that grow in the UK.

how fast do bamboo plants grow in the UK?

The Kew’s Tropical Glass House is where you’ll see these three giant bamboos in all their glory. 

So, when you’re in London, visit Kew and see these adorable plants. The Bamboo Garden and Minka Japanese House have over 130 collections of bamboo plants. 

This is by far one of the largest collections of bamboo you will see near London, UK. 

The Bamboo Garden is magnificent, quiet calm and soothing. You can wander through the beautiful walkways and the arching bamboos. Or relax and listen to the rustle of bamboo leaves against the wind. 

Check out our video and image collection of the bamboos at Kew’s Tropical Glass House and Japanese Bamboo Garden.

Uses of Giant Bamboo plants

The giant bamboos are so versatile, they earn the name ‘friends of the people’. 

The bamboo sticks are used in buildings, paper making, utensils and tools, musical instruments and even for food. 

They also protect watershed areas from flooding. In mountainsides, they are important barriers to preventing soil erosion.

However, the giant bamboo natural habitats have now been lost to urbanisation and agricultural land use. Yet, it is often planted in stands as a source of building materials.

Uses of Green Cordyline australis, red star and varigated Cornish Cabbage Palm

Cordyline australis is an exotic plant, also known as ‘Torbay or Cornish Cabbage Palm’. This upright plant has dark green sword-like leaves and clusters of white scented flowers, bees’ magnet.

The dry brown leaves have a special use that many gardeners will love to know. This article shows you how to prepare and use the leaves as an alternative to artificial garden ropes.

cordyline australis red start uses
Cordyline australis (Cornish Cabbage Plant) leaves are lovely garden ropes.

Uses of Cordyline australis leaves

Buy Cordyline australis ‘Cornish Cabbage’ plants at Crocus

This plant has long slender leaves. They are thin, flexible and strong. 

Plants with leaves like these are used successfully in traditional and survival settings for tying objects together.

If you have a Cordyline australis plant in the garden, you can use the leaf as an alternative to garden rope. 

Check out the 5 garden projects where the Cordyline australis leaves were used successfully as ropes. 


Benefits of bamboo plants- garden netting Use Cordyline australis ropes in the making of bamboo hoops and garden netting

How to prepare Cordyline australis leaves for garden rope

The long narrow leaves of Cordyline australis are perfect natural garden ropes. As shown in the garden projects, you can also use them to tie garden plants, flowers, new shoots and any garden plant that needs tying. Here is how to prepare the dry leaves to use as garden ropes.
  • Collect the dry brown leaves.
  • Soak them in water overnight.
  • Strip each leaf into smaller (preferable) strands.
  • Use the strands to tie plants.
To tie large objects, use a whole leaf or two. You can join the leaves together if you need a longer length. An example is this DIY Garden Planter Box, instead of nails we used only Cordyline australis leaves to build it.


Many people in the Pacific and Southeast Asia use the leaves from the palm trees, coconut and yacca plants and Cordyline fruticosa as ropes for tying plants. 

They also use the long green leaves for arts and crafts. However, the dry leaves are best for tying plants, flowers and shoots.

About Cordyline australis plant

cordyline australis green long leaves


Cordyline australis is evergreen and hardy shrub, commonly known as ‘Torbay or Cornish Cabbage Palm’. The Cornish Cabbage plant has long leaves and palm-like stems.

It produces a bunch of numerous tiny creamy white flowers in summer. You can keep an individual plant (or keep it lower) by pruning the old plants and encouraging a new single plant to take over.

This exotic shrub is perfect for landscaping, planted as a standalone plant or centrepiece. There are several cultivars of Cordyline australis ‘Cornish Cabbage Plants’, ranging from variegated leaves to green and burgundy red.

They are undemanding and low maintenance. The three common cultivars of Cordyline australis Cabbage plants are
  • Green Cordyline australis,
  • Cordyline australis red star and
  • Variegated Cordyline australis 'Torbay Dazzler'.

See the full collection at Crocus 

Do you know a garden plant like Cordyline australis?

As mentioned earlier, the dry brown leaves of Cordyline australis (‘Cornish Cabbage Plant’) are fantastic alternatives to garden ropes.

We’ve used the leaves as garden ropes in many garden projects (as shown in the images).

Hope you can try the ropes out if you have a Cordyline australis, Cordyline fruticosa or Yacca plant growing in your garden.

Do you have a garden plant like the bamboo stems or Yacca, Cordyline australis or Cordyline fruticosa plants? We would love to hear from you. Let us know in the comments below.

Here is the YouTube video of the strawberries netting project where we use the Cordyline australis leaves as a garden rope.